Outcome of heroin-dependent adolescents presenting for opiate substitution treatment.

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/302407
Title:
Outcome of heroin-dependent adolescents presenting for opiate substitution treatment.
Authors:
Smyth, Bobby P; Fagan, John; Kernan, Kathy
Affiliation:
Department of Public Health & Primary Care, Trinity College Dublin, Ireland. bobby.smyth@hse.ie
Citation:
Outcome of heroin-dependent adolescents presenting for opiate substitution treatment. 2012, 42 (1):35-44 J Subst Abuse Treat
Publisher:
Journal of substance abuse treatment
Journal:
Journal of substance abuse treatment
Issue Date:
Jan-2012
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/302407
DOI:
10.1016/j.jsat.2011.07.007
PubMed ID:
21940134
Additional Links:
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/?term=Outcome+of+heroin+dependent+adolescents+presenting+for+opiate+substitution
Abstract:
Because the outcome of methadone and buprenorphine substitution treatment in adolescents is unclear, we completed a retrospective cohort study of 100 consecutive heroin-dependent adolescents who sought these treatments over an 8-year recruitment period. The participants' average age was 16.6 years, and 54 were female. Half of the patient group remained in treatment for over 1 year. Among those still in treatment at 12 months, 39% demonstrated abstinence from heroin. The final route of departure from the treatment program was via planned detox for 22%, dropout for 32%, and imprisonment for 8%. The remaining 39% were transferred elsewhere for ongoing opiate substitution treatment after a median period of 23 months of treatment. Males were more likely to exit via imprisonment (p < .05), but other outcomes were not predicted by gender. There were no deaths during treatment among these 100 patients who had a cumulative period of 129 person years at risk. Our findings suggest that this treatment delivers reductions in heroin use and that one fifth of patients will exit treatment following detox completion within a 1- to 2-year time frame.
Item Type:
Article
Language:
en
Description:
Because the outcome of methadone and buprenorphine substitution treatment in adolescents is unclear, we completed a retrospective cohort study of 100 consecutive heroin-dependent adolescents who sought these treatments over an 8-year recruitment period. The participants' average age was 16.6 years, and 54 were female. Half of the patient group remained in treatment for over 1 year. Among those still in treatment at 12 months, 39% demonstrated abstinence from heroin. The final route of departure from the treatment program was via planned detox for 22%, dropout for 32%, and imprisonment for 8%. The remaining 39% were transferred elsewhere for ongoing opiate substitution treatment after a median period of 23 months of treatment. Males were more likely to exit via imprisonment (p < .05), but other outcomes were not predicted by gender. There were no deaths during treatment among these 100 patients who had a cumulative period of 129 person years at risk. Our findings suggest that this treatment delivers reductions in heroin use and that one fifth of patients will exit treatment following detox completion within a 1- to 2-year time frame.
MeSH:
Adolescent; Buprenorphine; Cohort Studies; Female; Heroin Dependence; Humans; Male; Methadone; Narcotics; Opiate Substitution Treatment; Prisoners; Retrospective Studies; Sex Factors; Substance Withdrawal Syndrome; Time Factors; Treatment Outcome
ISSN:
1873-6483

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorSmyth, Bobby Pen_GB
dc.contributor.authorFagan, Johnen_GB
dc.contributor.authorKernan, Kathyen_GB
dc.date.accessioned2013-09-27T10:59:28Z-
dc.date.available2013-09-27T10:59:28Z-
dc.date.issued2012-01-
dc.identifier.citationOutcome of heroin-dependent adolescents presenting for opiate substitution treatment. 2012, 42 (1):35-44 J Subst Abuse Treaten_GB
dc.identifier.issn1873-6483-
dc.identifier.pmid21940134-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.jsat.2011.07.007-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/302407-
dc.descriptionBecause the outcome of methadone and buprenorphine substitution treatment in adolescents is unclear, we completed a retrospective cohort study of 100 consecutive heroin-dependent adolescents who sought these treatments over an 8-year recruitment period. The participants' average age was 16.6 years, and 54 were female. Half of the patient group remained in treatment for over 1 year. Among those still in treatment at 12 months, 39% demonstrated abstinence from heroin. The final route of departure from the treatment program was via planned detox for 22%, dropout for 32%, and imprisonment for 8%. The remaining 39% were transferred elsewhere for ongoing opiate substitution treatment after a median period of 23 months of treatment. Males were more likely to exit via imprisonment (p < .05), but other outcomes were not predicted by gender. There were no deaths during treatment among these 100 patients who had a cumulative period of 129 person years at risk. Our findings suggest that this treatment delivers reductions in heroin use and that one fifth of patients will exit treatment following detox completion within a 1- to 2-year time frame.en_GB
dc.description.abstractBecause the outcome of methadone and buprenorphine substitution treatment in adolescents is unclear, we completed a retrospective cohort study of 100 consecutive heroin-dependent adolescents who sought these treatments over an 8-year recruitment period. The participants' average age was 16.6 years, and 54 were female. Half of the patient group remained in treatment for over 1 year. Among those still in treatment at 12 months, 39% demonstrated abstinence from heroin. The final route of departure from the treatment program was via planned detox for 22%, dropout for 32%, and imprisonment for 8%. The remaining 39% were transferred elsewhere for ongoing opiate substitution treatment after a median period of 23 months of treatment. Males were more likely to exit via imprisonment (p < .05), but other outcomes were not predicted by gender. There were no deaths during treatment among these 100 patients who had a cumulative period of 129 person years at risk. Our findings suggest that this treatment delivers reductions in heroin use and that one fifth of patients will exit treatment following detox completion within a 1- to 2-year time frame.-
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherJournal of substance abuse treatmenten_GB
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/?term=Outcome+of+heroin+dependent+adolescents+presenting+for+opiate+substitutionen_GB
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Journal of substance abuse treatmenten_GB
dc.subject.meshAdolescent-
dc.subject.meshBuprenorphine-
dc.subject.meshCohort Studies-
dc.subject.meshFemale-
dc.subject.meshHeroin Dependence-
dc.subject.meshHumans-
dc.subject.meshMale-
dc.subject.meshMethadone-
dc.subject.meshNarcotics-
dc.subject.meshOpiate Substitution Treatment-
dc.subject.meshPrisoners-
dc.subject.meshRetrospective Studies-
dc.subject.meshSex Factors-
dc.subject.meshSubstance Withdrawal Syndrome-
dc.subject.meshTime Factors-
dc.subject.meshTreatment Outcome-
dc.titleOutcome of heroin-dependent adolescents presenting for opiate substitution treatment.en_GB
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Public Health & Primary Care, Trinity College Dublin, Ireland. bobby.smyth@hse.ieen_GB
dc.identifier.journalJournal of substance abuse treatmenten_GB
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