Evaluation of the programme to support palliative and hospice care in the Republic of Ireland: Final report

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/301442
Title:
Evaluation of the programme to support palliative and hospice care in the Republic of Ireland: Final report
Authors:
Mc Carron, Mary; Higgins, Agnes; Larkin, Phil; Drennan, Jonathan; Mc Callion, Philip; Payne, Sheila; Hynes, Geralyn; May, Peter
Affiliation:
Trinity College Dublin (TCD)
Publisher:
Trinity College Dublin (TCD)
Issue Date:
Dec-2010
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/301442
Additional Links:
http://www.atlanticphilanthropies.org/sites/default/files/uploads/Evaluation_Programme_Support_Palliative_and_Hospice_Care_%20Republic_of_Ireland.pdf
Item Type:
Report
Language:
en
Description:
This executive summary will explain the remit of the evaluation undertaken and its associated methods; review some of the key findings and recommendations that emerged; and explain what the reader will find in the report’s subsequent chapters. There has been significant expansion in palliative care services in Ireland over the last 25 years, although gaps in provision remain (Irish Hospice Foundation, 2006). The Atlantic Philanthropies entered the field of hospice and palliative care in Ireland in 2004. The first project supported by The Atlantic Philanthropies was a baseline study of actual specialist palliative care (SPC) provision, as compared to that detailed by official government policy (Irish Hospice Foundation, 2006). The Atlantic Philanthropies issued a further 14 grants, totalling approximately € 25 million, in an initiative called the ‘End of Life’ programme (Appendix 1). The earliest ‘End of Life’ project began in 2004 and the latest is scheduled to continue until at least 2014. The programme encompasses both specialist and generalist palliative care service development, and sought to reach patients and their families across care settings and irrespective of diagnosis. This report presents the findings of a five-phased evaluation of the programme, which assessed the progress and impact of the programme to date, and the strategic learning for the field. This assessment considered both the context of historical and contemporary development of hospice and palliative care across Ireland, and a changing economic and policy landscape. Note that, throughout the report, the terms ‘End of Life’ programme and Hospice and Palliative Care programme are used interchangeably
Keywords:
PALLIATIVE CARE; HOSPICE
Local subject classification:
DEATH AND DYING

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorMc Carron, Maryen_GB
dc.contributor.authorHiggins, Agnesen_GB
dc.contributor.authorLarkin, Philen_GB
dc.contributor.authorDrennan, Jonathanen_GB
dc.contributor.authorMc Callion, Philipen_GB
dc.contributor.authorPayne, Sheilaen_GB
dc.contributor.authorHynes, Geralynen_GB
dc.contributor.authorMay, Peteren_GB
dc.date.accessioned2013-09-10T16:48:35Z-
dc.date.available2013-09-10T16:48:35Z-
dc.date.issued2010-12-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/301442-
dc.descriptionThis executive summary will explain the remit of the evaluation undertaken and its associated methods; review some of the key findings and recommendations that emerged; and explain what the reader will find in the report’s subsequent chapters. There has been significant expansion in palliative care services in Ireland over the last 25 years, although gaps in provision remain (Irish Hospice Foundation, 2006). The Atlantic Philanthropies entered the field of hospice and palliative care in Ireland in 2004. The first project supported by The Atlantic Philanthropies was a baseline study of actual specialist palliative care (SPC) provision, as compared to that detailed by official government policy (Irish Hospice Foundation, 2006). The Atlantic Philanthropies issued a further 14 grants, totalling approximately € 25 million, in an initiative called the ‘End of Life’ programme (Appendix 1). The earliest ‘End of Life’ project began in 2004 and the latest is scheduled to continue until at least 2014. The programme encompasses both specialist and generalist palliative care service development, and sought to reach patients and their families across care settings and irrespective of diagnosis. This report presents the findings of a five-phased evaluation of the programme, which assessed the progress and impact of the programme to date, and the strategic learning for the field. This assessment considered both the context of historical and contemporary development of hospice and palliative care across Ireland, and a changing economic and policy landscape. Note that, throughout the report, the terms ‘End of Life’ programme and Hospice and Palliative Care programme are used interchangeablyen_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherTrinity College Dublin (TCD)en_GB
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.atlanticphilanthropies.org/sites/default/files/uploads/Evaluation_Programme_Support_Palliative_and_Hospice_Care_%20Republic_of_Ireland.pdfen_GB
dc.subjectPALLIATIVE CAREen_GB
dc.subjectHOSPICEen_GB
dc.subject.otherDEATH AND DYINGen_GB
dc.titleEvaluation of the programme to support palliative and hospice care in the Republic of Ireland: Final reporten_GB
dc.typeReporten
dc.contributor.departmentTrinity College Dublin (TCD)en_GB
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