The new agenda on ageing: To make Ireland the best country to grow old in: Phase II - draft for consultation

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/300405
Title:
The new agenda on ageing: To make Ireland the best country to grow old in: Phase II - draft for consultation
Authors:
Ageing Well Network; Shannon, Sinead
Publisher:
Ageing Well Network
Issue Date:
2012
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/300405
Item Type:
Report
Language:
en
Description:
Throughout the developed world, people are living longer, healthier lives and as a result the proportion of older people has been increasing steadily over the past century. In 2011, Ireland had the highest proportion of young people (21.3%) in the EU, and the lowest proportion of old people (11.7%). However over the next thirty years this is about to change and the numbers of people aged over 65 years will be between 1.3 and 1.4 million in 2041, compared with 460,000 in 2006 and the number of “oldest old” - persons aged 80 years and over is projected to quadruple from a level of 110,000 in 2006 to about 440,000 in 2041. These significant changes in the structure of our population will have major implications for policy development, forward planning and integrated service delivery by Government, state agencies and others involved in provision of services and supports for older people. While Ireland has a short breathing space in which to plan the best possible future for everyone, we need to conceptualise new social roles for older people which take account of their additional healthy and active years and which focus on the opportunities as well as the challenges of an ageing population. What is needed is new thinking, backed by evidence, that focuses on the ‘demographic bounty’ by promoting quality of life and well-being, valuing the contribution older people make in their communities, promoting their independence, and removing the barriers, whether legal, attitudinal or income related, which limit or inhibit the capacity of older people to live life to the full. Taking this approach will not only benefit older people but will bring benefits to our communities for people of all ages.
Keywords:
OLDER PEOPLE; AGEING; QUALITY OF LIFE

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorAgeing Well Networken_GB
dc.contributor.authorShannon, Sineaden_GB
dc.date.accessioned2013-08-30T09:18:45Z-
dc.date.available2013-08-30T09:18:45Z-
dc.date.issued2012-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/300405-
dc.descriptionThroughout the developed world, people are living longer, healthier lives and as a result the proportion of older people has been increasing steadily over the past century. In 2011, Ireland had the highest proportion of young people (21.3%) in the EU, and the lowest proportion of old people (11.7%). However over the next thirty years this is about to change and the numbers of people aged over 65 years will be between 1.3 and 1.4 million in 2041, compared with 460,000 in 2006 and the number of “oldest old” - persons aged 80 years and over is projected to quadruple from a level of 110,000 in 2006 to about 440,000 in 2041. These significant changes in the structure of our population will have major implications for policy development, forward planning and integrated service delivery by Government, state agencies and others involved in provision of services and supports for older people. While Ireland has a short breathing space in which to plan the best possible future for everyone, we need to conceptualise new social roles for older people which take account of their additional healthy and active years and which focus on the opportunities as well as the challenges of an ageing population. What is needed is new thinking, backed by evidence, that focuses on the ‘demographic bounty’ by promoting quality of life and well-being, valuing the contribution older people make in their communities, promoting their independence, and removing the barriers, whether legal, attitudinal or income related, which limit or inhibit the capacity of older people to live life to the full. Taking this approach will not only benefit older people but will bring benefits to our communities for people of all ages.en_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherAgeing Well Networken_GB
dc.subjectOLDER PEOPLEen_GB
dc.subjectAGEINGen_GB
dc.subjectQUALITY OF LIFEen_GB
dc.titleThe new agenda on ageing: To make Ireland the best country to grow old in: Phase II - draft for consultationen_GB
dc.typeReporten
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