A mixed methods approach to understanding cyberbullying: A role for both quantitative and qualitative research

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/299947
Title:
A mixed methods approach to understanding cyberbullying: A role for both quantitative and qualitative research
Authors:
Espey, Karen; McGuckin, Conor; Duffy, Joseph
Citation:
Espey, K., Duffy, J., & Mc Guckin, C., A mixed methods approach to understanding cyberbullying: A role for both quantitative and qualitative research., Trinity Education Papers, 2, 2013, 112 - 126
Publisher:
Trinity Education Papers
Issue Date:
2013
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/299947
Item Type:
Article
Language:
en
Description:
The study investigated the incidence and nature of cyber-bullying within six post-primary schools in Northern Ireland. A mixed methods sequential explanatory design was employed. The first, quantitative phase involved questionnaires with 757 year 8 and year 11 pupils (57.5% females, n = 435; 42.5% males, n = 322) ranging in age from 11 to 15 years (mean = 13.04 years). The second, qualitative phase involved focus groups with two groups of pupils (n = 14). Cyber-bullying was less frequent than traditional bullying but levels were concerning. Bullying via the use of videos on a mobile phone was perceived to be most harmful. Pupils suggested blocking messages / numbers as the best coping strategy and many cyber-victims did not tell anyone about their experiences. Discussions with the young people suggested that the generational gap in understanding and knowledge of communication media may be one reason why young people are not choosing to tell adults. Cyber-bullying is a complex and concerning form of bullying. The study illustrated the value of person centred approaches, together with quantitative methods, as a design for investigating bullying behaviour. Implications for future research and interventions are discussed.
Keywords:
INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY; CHILD
Local subject classification:
BULLYING

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorEspey, Karenen_GB
dc.contributor.authorMcGuckin, Conoren_GB
dc.contributor.authorDuffy, Josephen_GB
dc.date.accessioned2013-08-27T15:47:33Z-
dc.date.available2013-08-27T15:47:33Z-
dc.date.issued2013-
dc.identifier.citationEspey, K., Duffy, J., & Mc Guckin, C., A mixed methods approach to understanding cyberbullying: A role for both quantitative and qualitative research., Trinity Education Papers, 2, 2013, 112 - 126en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/299947-
dc.descriptionThe study investigated the incidence and nature of cyber-bullying within six post-primary schools in Northern Ireland. A mixed methods sequential explanatory design was employed. The first, quantitative phase involved questionnaires with 757 year 8 and year 11 pupils (57.5% females, n = 435; 42.5% males, n = 322) ranging in age from 11 to 15 years (mean = 13.04 years). The second, qualitative phase involved focus groups with two groups of pupils (n = 14). Cyber-bullying was less frequent than traditional bullying but levels were concerning. Bullying via the use of videos on a mobile phone was perceived to be most harmful. Pupils suggested blocking messages / numbers as the best coping strategy and many cyber-victims did not tell anyone about their experiences. Discussions with the young people suggested that the generational gap in understanding and knowledge of communication media may be one reason why young people are not choosing to tell adults. Cyber-bullying is a complex and concerning form of bullying. The study illustrated the value of person centred approaches, together with quantitative methods, as a design for investigating bullying behaviour. Implications for future research and interventions are discussed.en_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherTrinity Education Papersen_GB
dc.subjectINFORMATION TECHNOLOGY-
dc.subjectCHILD-
dc.subject.otherBULLYING-
dc.titleA mixed methods approach to understanding cyberbullying: A role for both quantitative and qualitative researchen_GB
dc.typeArticleen
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