Changing generations: Findings from new research on intergenerational relations in Ireland

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/299852
Title:
Changing generations: Findings from new research on intergenerational relations in Ireland
Authors:
Scharf, Thomas; Timonen, Virpi; Carney, Gemma; Conlon, Catherine
Affiliation:
Social Policy and Ageing Research Centre (SPARC), Irish Centre for Social Gerontology (ICSG)
Publisher:
NUI Galway, Trinity College Dublin
Issue Date:
Apr-2013
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/299852
Additional Links:
http://www.sparc.tcd.ie/generations/assets/pdf/Changing_Generations_Reportjune2013.pdf
Item Type:
Report
Language:
en
Description:
This report presents key findings from the Changing Generations study – a collaborative research project undertaken between 2011 and 2013 by the Social Policy and Ageing Research Centre (SPARC), Trinity College Dublin, and the Irish Centre for Social Gerontology (ICSG), NUI Galway. Changing Generations addresses important issues concerning the relationships between different generations in Ireland. Against a backdrop marked by economic recession and demographic change, the focus is not only on how people of different generations live together, help each other and depend on one another in their daily lives, but also on how they perceive the social policies that support individuals at different stages of the life course. These are important features of what is termed in the scientific literature ‘intergenerational solidarity’. Practical examples of such solidarity include making provision to meet costs of health care, pensions and social welfare, and family members, friends or neighbours of different ages helping each other with everyday tasks. In some countries, there is a growing concern about the nature of intergenerational relations. Some commentators question the status of solidarity between the generations, increasingly pitting young against old. Understanding how people think about and practice intergenerational solidarity at individual and societal levels can provide an important foundation for a constructive dialogue about intergenerational relations in Ireland. By reporting on selected findings from a unique study, the Changing Generations team hopes to play a role in shaping such a dialogue.
Keywords:
OLDER PEOPLE; SOCIAL STUDY

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorScharf, Thomasen_GB
dc.contributor.authorTimonen, Virpien_GB
dc.contributor.authorCarney, Gemmaen_GB
dc.contributor.authorConlon, Catherineen_GB
dc.date.accessioned2013-08-26T13:53:33Z-
dc.date.available2013-08-26T13:53:33Z-
dc.date.issued2013-04-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/299852-
dc.descriptionThis report presents key findings from the Changing Generations study – a collaborative research project undertaken between 2011 and 2013 by the Social Policy and Ageing Research Centre (SPARC), Trinity College Dublin, and the Irish Centre for Social Gerontology (ICSG), NUI Galway. Changing Generations addresses important issues concerning the relationships between different generations in Ireland. Against a backdrop marked by economic recession and demographic change, the focus is not only on how people of different generations live together, help each other and depend on one another in their daily lives, but also on how they perceive the social policies that support individuals at different stages of the life course. These are important features of what is termed in the scientific literature ‘intergenerational solidarity’. Practical examples of such solidarity include making provision to meet costs of health care, pensions and social welfare, and family members, friends or neighbours of different ages helping each other with everyday tasks. In some countries, there is a growing concern about the nature of intergenerational relations. Some commentators question the status of solidarity between the generations, increasingly pitting young against old. Understanding how people think about and practice intergenerational solidarity at individual and societal levels can provide an important foundation for a constructive dialogue about intergenerational relations in Ireland. By reporting on selected findings from a unique study, the Changing Generations team hopes to play a role in shaping such a dialogue.en_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherNUI Galway, Trinity College Dublinen_GB
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.sparc.tcd.ie/generations/assets/pdf/Changing_Generations_Reportjune2013.pdfen_GB
dc.subjectOLDER PEOPLEen_GB
dc.subjectSOCIAL STUDYen_GB
dc.titleChanging generations: Findings from new research on intergenerational relations in Irelanden_GB
dc.typeReporten
dc.contributor.departmentSocial Policy and Ageing Research Centre (SPARC), Irish Centre for Social Gerontology (ICSG)en_GB
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