Glucose homeostasis in the intensive care: the end of a cycle

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/299240
Title:
Glucose homeostasis in the intensive care: the end of a cycle
Authors:
Murphy, JFA
Publisher:
Irish Medical Journal
Journal:
Irish Medical Journal
Issue Date:
Oct-2012
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/299240
Abstract:
Over the last decade there has been extensive literature and debate about blood glucose control in adults and children undergoing intensive care. The concept of tight glycaemic management began in adults and subsequently trickled down to paediatric patients. Hyperglycaemia is known to correlate with the degree of organ failure and death. The central question is whether hyperglycaemia is simply a marker of illness severity or a contributory factor in the patient’s illness. This is of fundamental importance in that it determines whether one should intervene or defer insulin treatment. The other issue is whether treatment with insulin is beneficial or harmful in this ICU setting. Possible explanations for the adverse effects of high glucose include pro-inflammatory responses. It was postulated that lethal perfusion injury to vital organs could be reduced by the prevention of hyperglycaemia with insulin. It was clear that randomised trials were needed to determine the best course of action.
Item Type:
Article
Language:
en
Keywords:
PREGNANCY

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorMurphy, JFAen_GB
dc.date.accessioned2013-08-20T09:43:48Z-
dc.date.available2013-08-20T09:43:48Z-
dc.date.issued2012-10-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/299240-
dc.description.abstractOver the last decade there has been extensive literature and debate about blood glucose control in adults and children undergoing intensive care. The concept of tight glycaemic management began in adults and subsequently trickled down to paediatric patients. Hyperglycaemia is known to correlate with the degree of organ failure and death. The central question is whether hyperglycaemia is simply a marker of illness severity or a contributory factor in the patient’s illness. This is of fundamental importance in that it determines whether one should intervene or defer insulin treatment. The other issue is whether treatment with insulin is beneficial or harmful in this ICU setting. Possible explanations for the adverse effects of high glucose include pro-inflammatory responses. It was postulated that lethal perfusion injury to vital organs could be reduced by the prevention of hyperglycaemia with insulin. It was clear that randomised trials were needed to determine the best course of action.en_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherIrish Medical Journalen_GB
dc.subjectPREGNANCYen_GB
dc.titleGlucose homeostasis in the intensive care: the end of a cycleen_GB
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalIrish Medical Journalen_GB
dc.description.fundingNo fundingen
dc.description.provinceLeinsteren
dc.description.peer-reviewpeer-reviewen
All Items in Lenus, The Irish Health Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.