Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/299208
Title:
Ageing & disability: A discussion paper
Authors:
National Disability Authority
Affiliation:
National Council on Ageing and Older People
Publisher:
National Disability Authority
Issue Date:
Feb-2006
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/299208
Additional Links:
http://www.wwda.org.au/agedisnda1.pdf
Item Type:
Report
Language:
en
Description:
The 2002 Census in Ireland showed 136,000 people with disabilities over the age of 65. This represents 42% of the disabled population and more than one-third of people over 65. The population aged 65 and over in Ireland could increase from its present level of 436,000 to about 1 million in the next thirty years. The population aged eighty years and over is projected to increase three-fold in the same period, to over 300,000 (Punch 2005). These simple facts give rise to questions about a possible ‘common agenda’ between people with disabilities and older people. Do people with disabilities and older people have similar health, housing, social, and transport service needs? Do they want similarly structured services? Do they prefer separate or integrated services? Do they experience similar types of social exclusion? Do they have similar concerns when seeking to claim their social, cultural and economic rights? A number of current trends make these questions relevant: projections of population ageing and a growing number of late-onset disabled people, the ageing of the disabled population, the higher proportion of women in paid work and concerns over the capacity of current support systems to cope with increased demand. Within the Irish health and social services people with disabilities and older people are constructed as two distinct client groups. Services are managed under two different National Care Group Managers within the Health Service Executive, and each group has a distinct budget. Similarly, differences in the social welfare entitlements of the two groups create anomalies in welfare provision. Given the boundaries set up by such administrative structures, questions arise as to how best to address the needs of people whose issues relate to both ageing and disability. The National Disability Authority (NDA) is the statutory body charged with advising the Minister for Justice, Equality and Law Reform on disability policy. The NDA recognises that older people with disabilities form a significant proportion of the people on whose behalf the NDA works. The National Council on Ageing and Older People is an advisory agency to the Minister for Health and Children and others on all aspects of ageing and the welfare of older people. The NCAOP recognises that an age friendly society will also be a disability friendly society, given the numbers of older people who have a disability and the numbers of people with a disability who are old. In 2004 the NCAOP and the NDA came together to begin to address these questions. Through the following discussion paper our two organisations hope to initiate constructive Ageing & Disability: A Discussion Paper NDA/NCAOP Page 2 dialogue about the ageing population with disabilities in order to develop, with Government and stakeholders, a positive national strategy for full participation and support of older people with disabilities, and to promote the implementation of such a strategy. The following discussion provides an overview of developments on ageing and disability. Chapter One defines the key terms of ‘disability’, ‘ageing’ and ‘dependency’ within the context of current social policy debates. Chapter Two describes the key policy themes arising in current international policy and practice literature. Chapter Three considers disability data collection practice in Europe, Australia and Ireland and ageing data collection in Ireland. Chapter Four provides an overview of the situation in the Republic of Ireland for older people with disabilities. Chapter Five discusses ways that positive social policy for older people with disabilities can be implemented in Ireland. Ultimately, two questions should guide our thinking: How can we create a society that enables the full participation of older people with disabilities, and how do we ensure that older people with disabilities receive the support they need in the manner they prefer.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorNational Disability Authorityen_GB
dc.date.accessioned2013-08-20T15:53:31Z-
dc.date.available2013-08-20T15:53:31Z-
dc.date.issued2006-02-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/299208-
dc.descriptionThe 2002 Census in Ireland showed 136,000 people with disabilities over the age of 65. This represents 42% of the disabled population and more than one-third of people over 65. The population aged 65 and over in Ireland could increase from its present level of 436,000 to about 1 million in the next thirty years. The population aged eighty years and over is projected to increase three-fold in the same period, to over 300,000 (Punch 2005). These simple facts give rise to questions about a possible ‘common agenda’ between people with disabilities and older people. Do people with disabilities and older people have similar health, housing, social, and transport service needs? Do they want similarly structured services? Do they prefer separate or integrated services? Do they experience similar types of social exclusion? Do they have similar concerns when seeking to claim their social, cultural and economic rights? A number of current trends make these questions relevant: projections of population ageing and a growing number of late-onset disabled people, the ageing of the disabled population, the higher proportion of women in paid work and concerns over the capacity of current support systems to cope with increased demand. Within the Irish health and social services people with disabilities and older people are constructed as two distinct client groups. Services are managed under two different National Care Group Managers within the Health Service Executive, and each group has a distinct budget. Similarly, differences in the social welfare entitlements of the two groups create anomalies in welfare provision. Given the boundaries set up by such administrative structures, questions arise as to how best to address the needs of people whose issues relate to both ageing and disability. The National Disability Authority (NDA) is the statutory body charged with advising the Minister for Justice, Equality and Law Reform on disability policy. The NDA recognises that older people with disabilities form a significant proportion of the people on whose behalf the NDA works. The National Council on Ageing and Older People is an advisory agency to the Minister for Health and Children and others on all aspects of ageing and the welfare of older people. The NCAOP recognises that an age friendly society will also be a disability friendly society, given the numbers of older people who have a disability and the numbers of people with a disability who are old. In 2004 the NCAOP and the NDA came together to begin to address these questions. Through the following discussion paper our two organisations hope to initiate constructive Ageing & Disability: A Discussion Paper NDA/NCAOP Page 2 dialogue about the ageing population with disabilities in order to develop, with Government and stakeholders, a positive national strategy for full participation and support of older people with disabilities, and to promote the implementation of such a strategy. The following discussion provides an overview of developments on ageing and disability. Chapter One defines the key terms of ‘disability’, ‘ageing’ and ‘dependency’ within the context of current social policy debates. Chapter Two describes the key policy themes arising in current international policy and practice literature. Chapter Three considers disability data collection practice in Europe, Australia and Ireland and ageing data collection in Ireland. Chapter Four provides an overview of the situation in the Republic of Ireland for older people with disabilities. Chapter Five discusses ways that positive social policy for older people with disabilities can be implemented in Ireland. Ultimately, two questions should guide our thinking: How can we create a society that enables the full participation of older people with disabilities, and how do we ensure that older people with disabilities receive the support they need in the manner they prefer.en_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherNational Disability Authorityen_GB
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.wwda.org.au/agedisnda1.pdfen_GB
dc.titleAgeing & disability: A discussion paperen_GB
dc.typeReporten
dc.contributor.departmentNational Council on Ageing and Older Peopleen_GB
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