A multi-center, randomized controlled trial of a group psychological intervention for psychosis with comorbid cannabis dependence over the early course of illness.

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/298891
Title:
A multi-center, randomized controlled trial of a group psychological intervention for psychosis with comorbid cannabis dependence over the early course of illness.
Authors:
Madigan, Kevin; Brennan, Daria; Lawlor, Elizabeth; Turner, Niall; Kinsella, Anthony; O'Connor, John J; Russell, Vincent; Waddington, John L; O'Callaghan, Eadbhard
Affiliation:
St. John of God Adult Mental Health Services, Cluain Mhuire Family Centre, Blackrock, Co. Dublin, Ireland; DETECT Early Intervention in Psychosis Service, Blackrock, Co. Dublin, Ireland. kevin.madigan@sjog.ie
Citation:
A multi-center, randomized controlled trial of a group psychological intervention for psychosis with comorbid cannabis dependence over the early course of illness. 2013, 143 (1):138-42 Schizophr. Res.
Journal:
Schizophrenia research
Issue Date:
Jan-2013
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/298891
DOI:
10.1016/j.schres.2012.10.018
PubMed ID:
23187069
Abstract:
Patients who experience the onset of psychotic illness with a comorbid diagnosis of cannabis dependence experience poor clinical outcomes. Few studies have identified interventions that reduce cannabis use and improve clinical outcome in this population.; We undertook a multi-center, randomized controlled trial of a group psychological intervention for psychosis with comorbid cannabis dependence to determine whether there was any impact on cannabis use symptoms, global functioning, insight, attitudes to treatment and subjective quality of life.; Across three centers, we compared a group psychological intervention, based on cognitive behavioral therapy and motivational interviewing, with treatment as usual among patients experiencing their first psychotic episode or early in the course of psychotic illness. Substance misuse and indices of clinical outcome were assessed at baseline, 3months and 1year.; At 3month and 1year follow-ups, there was no evidence for an intervention effect on cannabis use, symptoms, global functioning insight or attitude to treatment. However, the intervention improved subjective quality of life at 3months and this effect was sustained at 1year.; Over the early phase of psychotic illness, group psychological interventions for those with comorbid cannabis dependence improved subjective quality of life. However, this was not associated with reduction in use of cannabis or improvement in clinical outcomes.
Item Type:
Article
Language:
en
Description:
BACKGROUND: Patients who experience the onset of psychotic illness with a comorbid diagnosis of cannabis dependence experience poor clinical outcomes. Few studies have identified interventions that reduce cannabis use and improve clinical outcome in this population. AIMS: We undertook a multi-center, randomized controlled trial of a group psychological intervention for psychosis with comorbid cannabis dependence to determine whether there was any impact on cannabis use symptoms, global functioning, insight, attitudes to treatment and subjective quality of life. METHOD: Across three centers, we compared a group psychological intervention, based on cognitive behavioral therapy and motivational interviewing, with treatment as usual among patients experiencing their first psychotic episode or early in the course of psychotic illness. Substance misuse and indices of clinical outcome were assessed at baseline, 3months and 1year. RESULTS: At 3month and 1year follow-ups, there was no evidence for an intervention effect on cannabis use, symptoms, global functioning insight or attitude to treatment. However, the intervention improved subjective quality of life at 3months and this effect was sustained at 1year. CONCLUSIONS: Over the early phase of psychotic illness, group psychological interventions for those with comorbid cannabis dependence improved subjective quality of life. However, this was not associated with reduction in use of cannabis or improvement in clinical outcomes.
Keywords:
PSYCHOTIC DISORDER; CANNABIS
MeSH:
Adult; Age Factors; Analysis of Variance; Attitude; Cognitive Therapy; Female; Follow-Up Studies; Humans; Male; Marijuana Abuse; Psychiatric Status Rating Scales; Psychotic Disorders; Quality of Life; Recurrence; Severity of Illness Index; Young Adult
ISSN:
1573-2509

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorMadigan, Kevinen_GB
dc.contributor.authorBrennan, Dariaen_GB
dc.contributor.authorLawlor, Elizabethen_GB
dc.contributor.authorTurner, Niallen_GB
dc.contributor.authorKinsella, Anthonyen_GB
dc.contributor.authorO'Connor, John Jen_GB
dc.contributor.authorRussell, Vincenten_GB
dc.contributor.authorWaddington, John Len_GB
dc.contributor.authorO'Callaghan, Eadbharden_GB
dc.date.accessioned2013-08-15T13:44:58Z-
dc.date.available2013-08-15T13:44:58Z-
dc.date.issued2013-01-
dc.identifier.citationA multi-center, randomized controlled trial of a group psychological intervention for psychosis with comorbid cannabis dependence over the early course of illness. 2013, 143 (1):138-42 Schizophr. Res.en_GB
dc.identifier.issn1573-2509-
dc.identifier.pmid23187069-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.schres.2012.10.018-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/298891-
dc.descriptionBACKGROUND: Patients who experience the onset of psychotic illness with a comorbid diagnosis of cannabis dependence experience poor clinical outcomes. Few studies have identified interventions that reduce cannabis use and improve clinical outcome in this population. AIMS: We undertook a multi-center, randomized controlled trial of a group psychological intervention for psychosis with comorbid cannabis dependence to determine whether there was any impact on cannabis use symptoms, global functioning, insight, attitudes to treatment and subjective quality of life. METHOD: Across three centers, we compared a group psychological intervention, based on cognitive behavioral therapy and motivational interviewing, with treatment as usual among patients experiencing their first psychotic episode or early in the course of psychotic illness. Substance misuse and indices of clinical outcome were assessed at baseline, 3months and 1year. RESULTS: At 3month and 1year follow-ups, there was no evidence for an intervention effect on cannabis use, symptoms, global functioning insight or attitude to treatment. However, the intervention improved subjective quality of life at 3months and this effect was sustained at 1year. CONCLUSIONS: Over the early phase of psychotic illness, group psychological interventions for those with comorbid cannabis dependence improved subjective quality of life. However, this was not associated with reduction in use of cannabis or improvement in clinical outcomes.en_GB
dc.description.abstractPatients who experience the onset of psychotic illness with a comorbid diagnosis of cannabis dependence experience poor clinical outcomes. Few studies have identified interventions that reduce cannabis use and improve clinical outcome in this population.-
dc.description.abstractWe undertook a multi-center, randomized controlled trial of a group psychological intervention for psychosis with comorbid cannabis dependence to determine whether there was any impact on cannabis use symptoms, global functioning, insight, attitudes to treatment and subjective quality of life.-
dc.description.abstractAcross three centers, we compared a group psychological intervention, based on cognitive behavioral therapy and motivational interviewing, with treatment as usual among patients experiencing their first psychotic episode or early in the course of psychotic illness. Substance misuse and indices of clinical outcome were assessed at baseline, 3months and 1year.-
dc.description.abstractAt 3month and 1year follow-ups, there was no evidence for an intervention effect on cannabis use, symptoms, global functioning insight or attitude to treatment. However, the intervention improved subjective quality of life at 3months and this effect was sustained at 1year.-
dc.description.abstractOver the early phase of psychotic illness, group psychological interventions for those with comorbid cannabis dependence improved subjective quality of life. However, this was not associated with reduction in use of cannabis or improvement in clinical outcomes.-
dc.language.isoenen
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Schizophrenia researchen_GB
dc.subjectPSYCHOTIC DISORDERen_GB
dc.subjectCANNABISen_GB
dc.subject.meshAdult-
dc.subject.meshAge Factors-
dc.subject.meshAnalysis of Variance-
dc.subject.meshAttitude-
dc.subject.meshCognitive Therapy-
dc.subject.meshFemale-
dc.subject.meshFollow-Up Studies-
dc.subject.meshHumans-
dc.subject.meshMale-
dc.subject.meshMarijuana Abuse-
dc.subject.meshPsychiatric Status Rating Scales-
dc.subject.meshPsychotic Disorders-
dc.subject.meshQuality of Life-
dc.subject.meshRecurrence-
dc.subject.meshSeverity of Illness Index-
dc.subject.meshYoung Adult-
dc.titleA multi-center, randomized controlled trial of a group psychological intervention for psychosis with comorbid cannabis dependence over the early course of illness.en_GB
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentSt. John of God Adult Mental Health Services, Cluain Mhuire Family Centre, Blackrock, Co. Dublin, Ireland; DETECT Early Intervention in Psychosis Service, Blackrock, Co. Dublin, Ireland. kevin.madigan@sjog.ieen_GB
dc.identifier.journalSchizophrenia researchen_GB

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