What's distressing about having type 1 diabetes? A qualitative study of young adults' perspectives

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/298883
Title:
What's distressing about having type 1 diabetes? A qualitative study of young adults' perspectives
Authors:
Balfe, Myles; Doyle, Frank; Smith, Diarmuid; Sreenan, Seamus; Brugha, Ruairi; Hevey, David; Conroy, Ronan
Citation:
BMC Endocrine Disorders. 2013 Jul 25;13(1):25
Issue Date:
25-Jul-2013
URI:
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/1472-6823-13-25; http://hdl.handle.net/10147/298883
Abstract:
Abstract Background Diabetes distress is a general term that refers to the emotional burdens, anxieties, frustrations, stressors and worries that stem from managing a severe, complex condition like Type 1 diabetes. To date there has been limited research on diabetes-related distress in younger people with Type 1 diabetes. This qualitative study aimed to identify causes of diabetes distress in a sample of young adults with Type 1 diabetes. Methods Semi-structured interviews with 35 individuals with Type 1 diabetes (23–30 years of age). Results This study found diabetes related-distress to be common in a sample of young adults with Type 1 diabetes in the second phase of young adulthood (23–30 years of age). Diabetes distress was triggered by multiple factors, the most common of which were: self-consciousness/stigma, day-to-day diabetes management difficulties, having to fight the healthcare system, concerns about the future and apprehension about pregnancy. A number of factors appeared to moderate distress in this group, including having opportunities to talk to healthcare professionals, attending diabetes education programmes and joining peer support groups. Young adults felt that having opportunities to talk to healthcare professionals about diabetes distress should be a component of standard diabetes care. Conclusions Some aspects of living with diabetes frequently distress young adults with Type 1 diabetes who are in their twenties. Clinicians should facilitate young adults’ attendance at diabetes education programmes, provide them with opportunities to talk about their diabetes-related frustrations and difficulties and, where possible, assist in the development of peer-support networks for young adults with diabetes.
Item Type:
Article
Language:
en
Keywords:
DIABETES MELLITUS; YOUNG ADULT

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorBalfe, Mylesen_GB
dc.contributor.authorDoyle, Franken_GB
dc.contributor.authorSmith, Diarmuiden_GB
dc.contributor.authorSreenan, Seamusen_GB
dc.contributor.authorBrugha, Ruairien_GB
dc.contributor.authorHevey, Daviden_GB
dc.contributor.authorConroy, Ronanen_GB
dc.date.accessioned2013-08-15T11:06:58Z-
dc.date.available2013-08-15T11:06:58Z-
dc.date.issued2013-07-25-
dc.identifier.citationBMC Endocrine Disorders. 2013 Jul 25;13(1):25en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1186/1472-6823-13-25-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/298883-
dc.description.abstractAbstract Background Diabetes distress is a general term that refers to the emotional burdens, anxieties, frustrations, stressors and worries that stem from managing a severe, complex condition like Type 1 diabetes. To date there has been limited research on diabetes-related distress in younger people with Type 1 diabetes. This qualitative study aimed to identify causes of diabetes distress in a sample of young adults with Type 1 diabetes. Methods Semi-structured interviews with 35 individuals with Type 1 diabetes (23–30 years of age). Results This study found diabetes related-distress to be common in a sample of young adults with Type 1 diabetes in the second phase of young adulthood (23–30 years of age). Diabetes distress was triggered by multiple factors, the most common of which were: self-consciousness/stigma, day-to-day diabetes management difficulties, having to fight the healthcare system, concerns about the future and apprehension about pregnancy. A number of factors appeared to moderate distress in this group, including having opportunities to talk to healthcare professionals, attending diabetes education programmes and joining peer support groups. Young adults felt that having opportunities to talk to healthcare professionals about diabetes distress should be a component of standard diabetes care. Conclusions Some aspects of living with diabetes frequently distress young adults with Type 1 diabetes who are in their twenties. Clinicians should facilitate young adults’ attendance at diabetes education programmes, provide them with opportunities to talk about their diabetes-related frustrations and difficulties and, where possible, assist in the development of peer-support networks for young adults with diabetes.-
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subjectDIABETES MELLITUSen_GB
dc.subjectYOUNG ADULTen_GB
dc.titleWhat's distressing about having type 1 diabetes? A qualitative study of young adults' perspectivesen_GB
dc.typeArticleen
dc.language.rfc3066en-
dc.rights.holderMyles Balfe et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.-
dc.description.statusPeer Reviewed-
dc.date.updated2013-08-01T15:09:34Z-
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