Making a decisive impact on poverty through social partnership

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/297181
Title:
Making a decisive impact on poverty through social partnership
Authors:
Combat Poverty Agency
Publisher:
Combat Poverty Agency
Issue Date:
Nov-2005
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/297181
Item Type:
Report
Language:
en
Description:
This Submission presents the Combat Poverty perspective on the future direction of anti-poverty policy under a future social partnership agreement, with a particular focus on social welfare and public services. The key points are: • There must be a focus on making a decisive impact on poverty both through the Partnership Agreement and through the Irish National Action Plan against Poverty and Social Exclusion 2006-08. • Ireland has very low levels of social expenditure by European standards, even after controlling for confounding variables. Ireland spends particularly small sums in areas such as old-age expenditure and family services. Social expenditure should be increased where appropriate over the coming years to rectify the current deficits. • Policies that redistribute resources should be pursued as a policy goal. This requires that both regional and targeted approaches must be adopted to assist vulnerable groups and parts of Ireland that have not benefited from economic growth to the same extent as others. • The new National Action Plan against Poverty and Social Exclusion should be integrated into the Partnership Agreement. The plan, with its associated targets, needs to be delivered through relevant policies and programmes across government. The Plan should set new poverty reduction targets and move towards mainstreaming social inclusion in all aspects of national and local policymaking. This will require “joinedup” government, as well as setting standards, informed by socioeconomic rights, on what should be achieved. • Combat Poverty argues that ‘tailored universalism’ can be an effective paradigm to pursue, particularly in areas such as service provision for people with disabilities and childcare. This model is founded on a needs-based approach, and requires that service-providers tailor their services to accommodate a more diverse public. • While the policy of low direct taxation should be welcomed from a lowincome perspective (as this makes work pay for those on low incomes), efforts to continue to broaden the tax base should be pursued as a policy goal to improve the equity of the taxation system. Indirect taxes, being regressive in nature, should not be increased. • The Submission recommends improvements to current social welfare payments, paying particular attention to the area of child income support. Combat Poverty proposes a significant improvement in the levels of supports for second-tier (means-tested) child-income support with a recommended medium-term move towards an employmentneutral Child Benefit Supplement to replace Child-Dependent Allowances and Family Income Supplements. Submission on a New National Partnership Agreement Combat Poverty Agency November 2005 4 • In the area of healthcare, Combat Poverty proposes an emphasis on primary care with a strong focus on equity of access to such services. • The Submission recommends early childhood care and education for all 3- and 4- year-olds, with a focus on disadvantaged children first. In addition, a demand-side measure to assist low-income families meet the costs of early childhood care and education could be employed, in the short-term through an increase in the earnings’ disregard for the Family Income Supplement, or through a direct subvention to lowincome families. Alternatively, Child Benefit for the under-5s could be increased by €20 per month to assist with the costs of childcare. • In housing, Combat Poverty argues for a more ambitious programme of social and affordable housing, continued monitoring and refining of the Residential Accommodation Scheme, and more use of integrated transport and land-use planning in the creation of new, high-quality sustainable housing developments. • Combat Poverty supports a three-tier approach to the setting of poverty targets. Government should ensure that the real position of those in poverty improves over time, as measured by both income and deprivation. The rate of consistent poverty should be reduced and ideally eliminated by 2010. The rate of relative income poverty should be reduced in line with the EU norm. In addition to these overall targets, specific action must be taken to address the situation of groups who are more likely to be in poverty. The poverty-rate differential for vulnerable groups (compared to the average), should be halved. It is also important to revise the existing targets in the sectoral areas of health, education, housing and employment. Targets should be outcome-focused and measurable over time. • A number of recommendations are made in the area of participation and community involvement. These include, inter alia, continued and support for the National Anti-Poverty Networks Programme and the Community Development Support Programme. • Some recommendations are also provided in the area of institutional reform in the areas of leadership, rights and standards, poverty proofing, joined-up policy-making, resource allocation, and research and data requirements. • The rationale for Combat Poverty’s submission is to increase our efforts to promote social inclusion in Ireland in light of Ireland’s impressive wealth creation over the past decade, and to work to achieve a poverty-free society so that no child in Ireland has to grow up poor.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorCombat Poverty Agencyen_GB
dc.date.accessioned2013-07-31T08:52:39Z-
dc.date.available2013-07-31T08:52:39Z-
dc.date.issued2005-11-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/297181-
dc.descriptionThis Submission presents the Combat Poverty perspective on the future direction of anti-poverty policy under a future social partnership agreement, with a particular focus on social welfare and public services. The key points are: • There must be a focus on making a decisive impact on poverty both through the Partnership Agreement and through the Irish National Action Plan against Poverty and Social Exclusion 2006-08. • Ireland has very low levels of social expenditure by European standards, even after controlling for confounding variables. Ireland spends particularly small sums in areas such as old-age expenditure and family services. Social expenditure should be increased where appropriate over the coming years to rectify the current deficits. • Policies that redistribute resources should be pursued as a policy goal. This requires that both regional and targeted approaches must be adopted to assist vulnerable groups and parts of Ireland that have not benefited from economic growth to the same extent as others. • The new National Action Plan against Poverty and Social Exclusion should be integrated into the Partnership Agreement. The plan, with its associated targets, needs to be delivered through relevant policies and programmes across government. The Plan should set new poverty reduction targets and move towards mainstreaming social inclusion in all aspects of national and local policymaking. This will require “joinedup” government, as well as setting standards, informed by socioeconomic rights, on what should be achieved. • Combat Poverty argues that ‘tailored universalism’ can be an effective paradigm to pursue, particularly in areas such as service provision for people with disabilities and childcare. This model is founded on a needs-based approach, and requires that service-providers tailor their services to accommodate a more diverse public. • While the policy of low direct taxation should be welcomed from a lowincome perspective (as this makes work pay for those on low incomes), efforts to continue to broaden the tax base should be pursued as a policy goal to improve the equity of the taxation system. Indirect taxes, being regressive in nature, should not be increased. • The Submission recommends improvements to current social welfare payments, paying particular attention to the area of child income support. Combat Poverty proposes a significant improvement in the levels of supports for second-tier (means-tested) child-income support with a recommended medium-term move towards an employmentneutral Child Benefit Supplement to replace Child-Dependent Allowances and Family Income Supplements. Submission on a New National Partnership Agreement Combat Poverty Agency November 2005 4 • In the area of healthcare, Combat Poverty proposes an emphasis on primary care with a strong focus on equity of access to such services. • The Submission recommends early childhood care and education for all 3- and 4- year-olds, with a focus on disadvantaged children first. In addition, a demand-side measure to assist low-income families meet the costs of early childhood care and education could be employed, in the short-term through an increase in the earnings’ disregard for the Family Income Supplement, or through a direct subvention to lowincome families. Alternatively, Child Benefit for the under-5s could be increased by €20 per month to assist with the costs of childcare. • In housing, Combat Poverty argues for a more ambitious programme of social and affordable housing, continued monitoring and refining of the Residential Accommodation Scheme, and more use of integrated transport and land-use planning in the creation of new, high-quality sustainable housing developments. • Combat Poverty supports a three-tier approach to the setting of poverty targets. Government should ensure that the real position of those in poverty improves over time, as measured by both income and deprivation. The rate of consistent poverty should be reduced and ideally eliminated by 2010. The rate of relative income poverty should be reduced in line with the EU norm. In addition to these overall targets, specific action must be taken to address the situation of groups who are more likely to be in poverty. The poverty-rate differential for vulnerable groups (compared to the average), should be halved. It is also important to revise the existing targets in the sectoral areas of health, education, housing and employment. Targets should be outcome-focused and measurable over time. • A number of recommendations are made in the area of participation and community involvement. These include, inter alia, continued and support for the National Anti-Poverty Networks Programme and the Community Development Support Programme. • Some recommendations are also provided in the area of institutional reform in the areas of leadership, rights and standards, poverty proofing, joined-up policy-making, resource allocation, and research and data requirements. • The rationale for Combat Poverty’s submission is to increase our efforts to promote social inclusion in Ireland in light of Ireland’s impressive wealth creation over the past decade, and to work to achieve a poverty-free society so that no child in Ireland has to grow up poor.en_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherCombat Poverty Agencyen_GB
dc.titleMaking a decisive impact on poverty through social partnershipen_GB
dc.typeReporten
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