The establishment of hospital groups as a transition to independent hospital trusts

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/296819
Title:
The establishment of hospital groups as a transition to independent hospital trusts
Authors:
Department of Health (DoH)
Publisher:
Department of Health (DoH)
Issue Date:
Feb-2013
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/296819
Additional Links:
http://www.doh.ie
Item Type:
Report
Language:
en
Description:
Quality, patient safety, access and value for money are the principles on which current health policy is based. Within that policy, health services aim to provide efficient and effective care, as close to the patient’s home as possible, with a view to improved health outcomes and satisfaction for patients. Ours is a small country with increasing demands on our healthcare system. These demands include demographic changes, increased public expectations and inequalities in access to care. The changing nature of healthcare - new technologies and clinical specialisation - and financial and regulatory pressures from national and international bodies - add further challenges. The Irish healthcare system is being reformed to meet these challenges: primary, social and community delivered care is being optimised; the range of care delivered in hospitals and the manner of its delivery is changing. For instance, specialist and complex care is being centralised and there is an increasing use of day case procedures in all specialties. Also national clinical programmes have been established to improve and standardise patient care, by bringing together clinical disciplines and enabling them to share innovative ways of delivering greater benefits for patients. Acute hospitals, the focus of this report, are but one element of the healthcare landscape. We have a large number and range of acute hospitals in Ireland, each held in high esteem and accessed primarily by its local population for most of their hospital care. However, it is difficult to achieve the necessary reform and developments required of our hospitals while they exist in isolation one from another. The provision of quality, safe healthcare requires increasing levels of co-operation and overarching systems of clinical governance and communication. The formation of Irish acute hospitals into a small number of groups, each with its own governance and management, will provide an optimum configuration for hospital services to deliver high quality, safe patient care in a cost effective manner. Grouping hospitals will allow appropriate integration and improve patient flow across the continuum of care. Each grouping will include a primary academic partner which will stimulate a culture of learning and openness to change within the hospital group. These groups will lead in the future to the establishment of hospital trusts on a statutory basis and the introduction of Universal Health Insurance (UHI), a key commitment in the Programme for Government 2011. The report recommends what these groups should be, sets out a governance and management framework and recommends an open and transparent process for the appointment of chief executives of future hospital trusts.
Keywords:
HOSPITALS; HEALTH SERVICES AND THEIR MANAGEMENT; GOVERNANCE; HEALTH POLICY

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorDepartment of Health (DoH)en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2013-07-22T14:53:49Z-
dc.date.available2013-07-22T14:53:49Z-
dc.date.issued2013-02-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/296819-
dc.descriptionQuality, patient safety, access and value for money are the principles on which current health policy is based. Within that policy, health services aim to provide efficient and effective care, as close to the patient’s home as possible, with a view to improved health outcomes and satisfaction for patients. Ours is a small country with increasing demands on our healthcare system. These demands include demographic changes, increased public expectations and inequalities in access to care. The changing nature of healthcare - new technologies and clinical specialisation - and financial and regulatory pressures from national and international bodies - add further challenges. The Irish healthcare system is being reformed to meet these challenges: primary, social and community delivered care is being optimised; the range of care delivered in hospitals and the manner of its delivery is changing. For instance, specialist and complex care is being centralised and there is an increasing use of day case procedures in all specialties. Also national clinical programmes have been established to improve and standardise patient care, by bringing together clinical disciplines and enabling them to share innovative ways of delivering greater benefits for patients. Acute hospitals, the focus of this report, are but one element of the healthcare landscape. We have a large number and range of acute hospitals in Ireland, each held in high esteem and accessed primarily by its local population for most of their hospital care. However, it is difficult to achieve the necessary reform and developments required of our hospitals while they exist in isolation one from another. The provision of quality, safe healthcare requires increasing levels of co-operation and overarching systems of clinical governance and communication. The formation of Irish acute hospitals into a small number of groups, each with its own governance and management, will provide an optimum configuration for hospital services to deliver high quality, safe patient care in a cost effective manner. Grouping hospitals will allow appropriate integration and improve patient flow across the continuum of care. Each grouping will include a primary academic partner which will stimulate a culture of learning and openness to change within the hospital group. These groups will lead in the future to the establishment of hospital trusts on a statutory basis and the introduction of Universal Health Insurance (UHI), a key commitment in the Programme for Government 2011. The report recommends what these groups should be, sets out a governance and management framework and recommends an open and transparent process for the appointment of chief executives of future hospital trusts.en_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherDepartment of Health (DoH)en_GB
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.doh.ieen_GB
dc.subjectHOSPITALSen_GB
dc.subjectHEALTH SERVICES AND THEIR MANAGEMENTen_GB
dc.subjectGOVERNANCEen_GB
dc.subjectHEALTH POLICYen_GB
dc.titleThe establishment of hospital groups as a transition to independent hospital trustsen_GB
dc.typeReporten
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