Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/296523
Title:
Inclusion is everyone's business
Authors:
Nolan, Ann
Affiliation:
The Social Inclusion Unit Dublin City Council
Publisher:
Dublin City Council
Issue Date:
2005
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/296523
Item Type:
Report
Language:
en
Description:
This report examines Dublin City and there are five additional reports, which each examine one of the five Dublin City Operational Areas. The reports examine each area to assess statutory social inclusion interventions based on target groups identified in the National Development Plan (NDP) National Anti-Poverty Strategy (NAPS) and National Action Plan against Social Exclusion (NAPs/incl.); and to inform discussions regarding a Social Inclusion Plan for the area. The research was carried out by Ann Nolan, a social researcher, while the research process was managed by Dublin City’s SIU. The research was conducted between January and May 2004 and findings in the report relate to that time frame. Key Findings of Research Process · At present there is no feasible means of accurately tracking social inclusion expenditure or of measuring outcomes for the NAPS ‘vulnerable’ groups until such time as all Government departments and State agencies are (1) utilising the same unit of measurement so that irrespective of the difference in overall boundaries, each agency can supply information based on an area, which lends itself to comparative analysis; and (2) employing standard criteria for the categorisation of target groups at which funding is aimed. This would enable the efficient utilisation of a rich source of data – the administrative records of each statutory agency. A submission to this effect has been made to the Irish Spatial Data Infrastructure consultation process. · The Data Strategy, which underpins the NAPS and NAPs/incl. process, requires substantial development in order to fulfil the requirement for data in relation to particular groups of people vulnerable to poverty. · SITFs would benefit greatly from access to the support of the Technical Advisory Group (drawn from relevant Government departments and data experts), which has been established under the NAPS and NAPs/incl. processes to support the work of the Office for Social Inclusion. · The NAPS and NAPs/incl. targets are essentially National in focus. In most cases, they do not take account of spatial differentials e.g. in terms of ‘consistent poverty’. Consequently, National targets might not, in some cases be realistic for Dublin City.
Keywords:
SOCIAL EXCLUSION

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorNolan, Annen_GB
dc.date.accessioned2013-07-19T10:58:09Z-
dc.date.available2013-07-19T10:58:09Z-
dc.date.issued2005-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/296523-
dc.descriptionThis report examines Dublin City and there are five additional reports, which each examine one of the five Dublin City Operational Areas. The reports examine each area to assess statutory social inclusion interventions based on target groups identified in the National Development Plan (NDP) National Anti-Poverty Strategy (NAPS) and National Action Plan against Social Exclusion (NAPs/incl.); and to inform discussions regarding a Social Inclusion Plan for the area. The research was carried out by Ann Nolan, a social researcher, while the research process was managed by Dublin City’s SIU. The research was conducted between January and May 2004 and findings in the report relate to that time frame. Key Findings of Research Process · At present there is no feasible means of accurately tracking social inclusion expenditure or of measuring outcomes for the NAPS ‘vulnerable’ groups until such time as all Government departments and State agencies are (1) utilising the same unit of measurement so that irrespective of the difference in overall boundaries, each agency can supply information based on an area, which lends itself to comparative analysis; and (2) employing standard criteria for the categorisation of target groups at which funding is aimed. This would enable the efficient utilisation of a rich source of data – the administrative records of each statutory agency. A submission to this effect has been made to the Irish Spatial Data Infrastructure consultation process. · The Data Strategy, which underpins the NAPS and NAPs/incl. process, requires substantial development in order to fulfil the requirement for data in relation to particular groups of people vulnerable to poverty. · SITFs would benefit greatly from access to the support of the Technical Advisory Group (drawn from relevant Government departments and data experts), which has been established under the NAPS and NAPs/incl. processes to support the work of the Office for Social Inclusion. · The NAPS and NAPs/incl. targets are essentially National in focus. In most cases, they do not take account of spatial differentials e.g. in terms of ‘consistent poverty’. Consequently, National targets might not, in some cases be realistic for Dublin City.en_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherDublin City Councilen_GB
dc.subjectSOCIAL EXCLUSIONen_GB
dc.titleInclusion is everyone's businessen_GB
dc.typeReporten
dc.contributor.departmentThe Social Inclusion Unit Dublin City Councilen_GB
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