Laparotomy and laparoscopy diversely affect macrophage-associated antimicrobial activity in a murine model

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/296260
Title:
Laparotomy and laparoscopy diversely affect macrophage-associated antimicrobial activity in a murine model
Authors:
Huang, Shun Gen; Li, Yi Ping; Zhang, Qi; Redmond, H Paul; Wang, Jiang Huai; Wang, Jian
Citation:
BMC Immunology. 2013 Jun 20;14(1):27
Issue Date:
20-Jun-2013
URI:
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/1471-2172-14-27; http://hdl.handle.net/10147/296260
Abstract:
Abstract Background Surgical intervention-related trauma contributes largely to the development of postoperative immunosuppression, with reduced resistance to secondary bacterial infection. This study compared the impact of laparotomy versus laparoscopy on macrophage-associated bactericidal ability and examined whether laparotomy renders the host more susceptible to microbial infection. Results BALB/c mice were randomized into control, laparotomy, and laparoscopy groups. Laparotomy, but not laparoscopy, significantly downregulated CR3 expression on macrophages, diminished macrophage-induced uptake and phagocytosis of E. coli and S. aureus, and impaired macrophage-mediated intracellular bacterial killing. Consistent with this, mice that underwent laparotomy displayed substantially higher bacterial counts in the blood and visceral organs as well as a significantly enhanced mortality rate following bacterial infection, whereas mice subjected to laparoscopy did not show any defects in their bacterial clearance. Conclusion Laparotomy has an adverse effect on host innate immunity against microbial infection by impairing macrophage-mediated phagocytosis and killing of the invaded bacteria. By contrast, laparoscopy appears to preserve macrophage-associated bactericidal ability, thus alleviating the development of postoperative immunosuppression.
Item Type:
Journal Article

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorHuang, Shun Gen-
dc.contributor.authorLi, Yi Ping-
dc.contributor.authorZhang, Qi-
dc.contributor.authorRedmond, H Paul-
dc.contributor.authorWang, Jiang Huai-
dc.contributor.authorWang, Jian-
dc.date.accessioned2013-07-17T09:12:31Z-
dc.date.available2013-07-17T09:12:31Z-
dc.date.issued2013-06-20-
dc.identifier.citationBMC Immunology. 2013 Jun 20;14(1):27-
dc.identifier.urihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1186/1471-2172-14-27-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/296260-
dc.description.abstractAbstract Background Surgical intervention-related trauma contributes largely to the development of postoperative immunosuppression, with reduced resistance to secondary bacterial infection. This study compared the impact of laparotomy versus laparoscopy on macrophage-associated bactericidal ability and examined whether laparotomy renders the host more susceptible to microbial infection. Results BALB/c mice were randomized into control, laparotomy, and laparoscopy groups. Laparotomy, but not laparoscopy, significantly downregulated CR3 expression on macrophages, diminished macrophage-induced uptake and phagocytosis of E. coli and S. aureus, and impaired macrophage-mediated intracellular bacterial killing. Consistent with this, mice that underwent laparotomy displayed substantially higher bacterial counts in the blood and visceral organs as well as a significantly enhanced mortality rate following bacterial infection, whereas mice subjected to laparoscopy did not show any defects in their bacterial clearance. Conclusion Laparotomy has an adverse effect on host innate immunity against microbial infection by impairing macrophage-mediated phagocytosis and killing of the invaded bacteria. By contrast, laparoscopy appears to preserve macrophage-associated bactericidal ability, thus alleviating the development of postoperative immunosuppression.-
dc.titleLaparotomy and laparoscopy diversely affect macrophage-associated antimicrobial activity in a murine model-
dc.typeJournal Article-
dc.language.rfc3066en-
dc.rights.holderShun Gen Huang et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.-
dc.description.statusPeer Reviewed-
dc.date.updated2013-07-15T19:09:04Z-
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