Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/296202
Title:
Fatigue and the delivery of medical care
Authors:
Murphy, JFA
Publisher:
Irish medical Journal
Journal:
Irish Medical Journal
Issue Date:
Jan-2011
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/296202
Additional Links:
http://www.imj.ie//ViewArticleDetails.aspx?ContentID=4020
Abstract:
Lack of sleep has well established effects on physiological, cognitive and behavioural functionality. Sleep deprivation can adversely affect clinical performance as severely as alcohol according to some sources. Sleep deficiency may be due to loss of one night’s sleep or repeated interruptions of sleep. Chronic sleep degrades the ability to recognise one’s ability to recognise the impairments induced by sleep loss. The problem of sleep deprivation has vexed acute medical practice for decades. Improvement has been painfully slow. The problem is that all 168 hours throughout every week of every year have to be covered and there are a finite number of doctors to shoulder the burden. There are many strongly held views about how best to provide night-time and week-end care. Constructive innovations are thin on the ground. The biggest gap is between administration and doctors with financial considerations being the limiting factor. It is, however, generally accepted on all sides that sleep loss and fatigue can have adverse effects on both patients and doctors.
Item Type:
Article
Language:
en

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorMurphy, JFAen_GB
dc.date.accessioned2013-07-16T13:28:34Z-
dc.date.available2013-07-16T13:28:34Z-
dc.date.issued2011-01-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/296202-
dc.description.abstractLack of sleep has well established effects on physiological, cognitive and behavioural functionality. Sleep deprivation can adversely affect clinical performance as severely as alcohol according to some sources. Sleep deficiency may be due to loss of one night’s sleep or repeated interruptions of sleep. Chronic sleep degrades the ability to recognise one’s ability to recognise the impairments induced by sleep loss. The problem of sleep deprivation has vexed acute medical practice for decades. Improvement has been painfully slow. The problem is that all 168 hours throughout every week of every year have to be covered and there are a finite number of doctors to shoulder the burden. There are many strongly held views about how best to provide night-time and week-end care. Constructive innovations are thin on the ground. The biggest gap is between administration and doctors with financial considerations being the limiting factor. It is, however, generally accepted on all sides that sleep loss and fatigue can have adverse effects on both patients and doctors.en_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherIrish medical Journalen_GB
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.imj.ie//ViewArticleDetails.aspx?ContentID=4020en_GB
dc.titleFatigue and the delivery of medical careen_GB
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalIrish Medical Journalen_GB
dc.description.fundingNo fundingen
dc.description.provinceLeinsteren
dc.description.peer-reviewpeer-reviewen
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