Fallout of the enterocolitis, autism, MMR vaccine paper.

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/296197
Title:
Fallout of the enterocolitis, autism, MMR vaccine paper.
Authors:
Murphy, J F A
Citation:
Fallout of the enterocolitis, autism, MMR vaccine paper. 2011, 104 (2):36 Ir Med J
Publisher:
Irish Medical Journal
Journal:
Irish medical journal
Issue Date:
Feb-2011
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/296197
PubMed ID:
21465869
Additional Links:
http://www.imj.ie//ViewArticleDetails.aspx?ContentID=4030
Abstract:
On the 28th Feb 1998 The Lancet published a paper by Andrew Wakefield 1 that proposed a new condition of enterocolitis, regressive autism and an association with MMR vaccine as the apparent precipitating event. At a press conference describing the 12 children case series he urged the use of single vaccines instead of MMR. The study generated immediate alarm and controversy. After its publication the findings had far reaching consequences. The implication that the MMR vaccine could precipitate Crohnâ s disease and Autism was widely disseminated by the media. Attempts by the health authorities to reassure and calm fears were ineffective. Parents became extremely alarmed. Public confidence in the MMR vaccine was undermined and immunisation rates fell sharply below the critical 92% required for herd immunity. There was a rapid resurgence in the numbers of children affected with measles. Dublin was particularly badly affected. A paper published in 2003 describing the Irish experience of measles reappearance received worldwide attention 2 . It graphically illustrated the damage that can be caused when a vaccination programme is impaired. A total of 355 children attended Temple Street A&E with Measles and 111 were admitted with either pneumonitis or dehydration. Seven children required ventilation and 3 children died. The allegations against the MMR vaccine were difficult to refute and the restoration of confidence in the vaccine was painfully slow. An IMJ commentary in 2000 stated that the current large number of children developing Measles was due to the significant reduction in the proportion being administered MMR vaccination 3 . Vaccination rates were as low as 75% in some parts of the country. The Dept. of Health had become very concerned. The then Minister for Health and Children Michael Martin launched â A Vaccination Awareness Campaignâ to highlight the problem. Despite everybodyâ s best efforts the problem of low vaccine uptake rumbled on. This is not surprising. Allegations of vaccine risk are difficult to defend. In relation to vaccination, todayâ s allegation is remembered long after tomorrowâ s explanation is forgotten.
Item Type:
Article
Language:
en
MeSH:
Autistic Disorder; Child; Crohn Disease; History, 20th Century; Humans; Measles-Mumps-Rubella Vaccine; Medical Errors; Periodicals as Topic
ISSN:
0332-3102

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorMurphy, J F Aen_GB
dc.date.accessioned2013-07-16T13:35:46Z-
dc.date.available2013-07-16T13:35:46Z-
dc.date.issued2011-02-
dc.identifier.citationFallout of the enterocolitis, autism, MMR vaccine paper. 2011, 104 (2):36 Ir Med Jen_GB
dc.identifier.issn0332-3102-
dc.identifier.pmid21465869-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/296197-
dc.description.abstractOn the 28th Feb 1998 The Lancet published a paper by Andrew Wakefield 1 that proposed a new condition of enterocolitis, regressive autism and an association with MMR vaccine as the apparent precipitating event. At a press conference describing the 12 children case series he urged the use of single vaccines instead of MMR. The study generated immediate alarm and controversy. After its publication the findings had far reaching consequences. The implication that the MMR vaccine could precipitate Crohnâ s disease and Autism was widely disseminated by the media. Attempts by the health authorities to reassure and calm fears were ineffective. Parents became extremely alarmed. Public confidence in the MMR vaccine was undermined and immunisation rates fell sharply below the critical 92% required for herd immunity. There was a rapid resurgence in the numbers of children affected with measles. Dublin was particularly badly affected. A paper published in 2003 describing the Irish experience of measles reappearance received worldwide attention 2 . It graphically illustrated the damage that can be caused when a vaccination programme is impaired. A total of 355 children attended Temple Street A&E with Measles and 111 were admitted with either pneumonitis or dehydration. Seven children required ventilation and 3 children died. The allegations against the MMR vaccine were difficult to refute and the restoration of confidence in the vaccine was painfully slow. An IMJ commentary in 2000 stated that the current large number of children developing Measles was due to the significant reduction in the proportion being administered MMR vaccination 3 . Vaccination rates were as low as 75% in some parts of the country. The Dept. of Health had become very concerned. The then Minister for Health and Children Michael Martin launched â A Vaccination Awareness Campaignâ to highlight the problem. Despite everybodyâ s best efforts the problem of low vaccine uptake rumbled on. This is not surprising. Allegations of vaccine risk are difficult to defend. In relation to vaccination, todayâ s allegation is remembered long after tomorrowâ s explanation is forgotten.en_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherIrish Medical Journalen_GB
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.imj.ie//ViewArticleDetails.aspx?ContentID=4030en_GB
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Irish medical journalen_GB
dc.subject.meshAutistic Disorder-
dc.subject.meshChild-
dc.subject.meshCrohn Disease-
dc.subject.meshHistory, 20th Century-
dc.subject.meshHumans-
dc.subject.meshMeasles-Mumps-Rubella Vaccine-
dc.subject.meshMedical Errors-
dc.subject.meshPeriodicals as Topic-
dc.titleFallout of the enterocolitis, autism, MMR vaccine paper.en_GB
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalIrish medical journalen_GB
dc.description.fundingNo fundingen
dc.description.provinceLeinsteren
dc.description.peer-reviewpeer-reviewen

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