Saving Mothers' Lives: Reviewing maternal deaths to make motherhood safer: 2006-2008. The Eighth Report of the Confidential Enquiries into Maternal Deaths in the United Kingdom.

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/296165
Title:
Saving Mothers' Lives: Reviewing maternal deaths to make motherhood safer: 2006-2008. The Eighth Report of the Confidential Enquiries into Maternal Deaths in the United Kingdom.
Authors:
Cantwell, Roch; Clutton-Brock, Thomas; Cooper, Griselda; Dawson, Andrew; Drife, James; Garrod, Debbie; Harper, Ann; Hulbert, Diana; Lucas, Sebastian; McClure, John; Millward-Sadler, Harry; Neilson, James; Nelson-Piercy, Catherine; Norman, Jane; O'Herlihy, Colm; Oates, Margaret; Shakespeare, Judy; de Swiet, Michael; Williamson, Catherine; Beale, Valerie; Knight, Marian; Lennox, Christopher; Miller, Alison; Parmar, Dharmishta; Rogers, Jane; Springett, Anna
Citation:
Saving Mothers' Lives: Reviewing maternal deaths to make motherhood safer: 2006-2008. The Eighth Report of the Confidential Enquiries into Maternal Deaths in the United Kingdom. 2011, 118 Suppl 1:1-203 BJOG
Publisher:
BJOG : an international journal of obstetrics and gynaecology
Journal:
BJOG : an international journal of obstetrics and gynaecology
Issue Date:
Mar-2011
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/296165
DOI:
10.1111/j.1471-0528.2010.02847.x
PubMed ID:
21356004
Abstract:
In the triennium 2006-2008, 261 women in the UK died directly or indirectly related to pregnancy. The overall maternal mortality rate was 11.39 per 100,000 maternities. Direct deaths decreased from 6.24 per 100,000 maternities in 2003-2005 to 4.67 per 100,000 maternities in 2006–2008 (p = 0.02). This decline is predominantly due to the reduction in deaths from thromboembolism and, to a lesser extent, haemorrhage. For the first time there has been a reduction in the inequalities gap, with a significant decrease in maternal mortality rates among those living in the most deprived areas and those in the lowest socio-economic group. Despite a decline in the overall UK maternal mortality rate, there has been an increase in deaths related to genital tract sepsis, particularly from community acquired Group A streptococcal disease. The mortality rate related to sepsis increased from 0.85 deaths per 100,000 maternities in 2003-2005 to 1.13 deaths in 2006-2008, and sepsis is now the most common cause of Direct maternal death. Cardiac disease is the most common cause of Indirect death; the Indirect maternal mortality rate has not changed significantly since 2003-2005. This Confidential Enquiry identified substandard care in 70% of Direct deaths and 55% of Indirect deaths. Many of the identified avoidable factors remain the same as those identified in previous Enquiries. Recommendations for improving care have been developed and are highlighted in this report. Implementing the Top ten recommendations should be prioritised in order to ensure the overall UK maternal mortality rate continues to decline.
Item Type:
Article
Language:
en
MeSH:
Counseling; Female; Great Britain; Health Status; Humans; Maternal Health Services; Maternal Mortality; Patient Care Team; Practice Guidelines as Topic; Preconception Care; Pregnancy; Pregnancy Complications; Pregnancy Outcome; Prenatal Care; Quality of Health Care; Referral and Consultation
ISSN:
1471-0528

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorCantwell, Rochen_GB
dc.contributor.authorClutton-Brock, Thomasen_GB
dc.contributor.authorCooper, Griseldaen_GB
dc.contributor.authorDawson, Andrewen_GB
dc.contributor.authorDrife, Jamesen_GB
dc.contributor.authorGarrod, Debbieen_GB
dc.contributor.authorHarper, Annen_GB
dc.contributor.authorHulbert, Dianaen_GB
dc.contributor.authorLucas, Sebastianen_GB
dc.contributor.authorMcClure, Johnen_GB
dc.contributor.authorMillward-Sadler, Harryen_GB
dc.contributor.authorNeilson, Jamesen_GB
dc.contributor.authorNelson-Piercy, Catherineen_GB
dc.contributor.authorNorman, Janeen_GB
dc.contributor.authorO'Herlihy, Colmen_GB
dc.contributor.authorOates, Margareten_GB
dc.contributor.authorShakespeare, Judyen_GB
dc.contributor.authorde Swiet, Michaelen_GB
dc.contributor.authorWilliamson, Catherineen_GB
dc.contributor.authorBeale, Valerieen_GB
dc.contributor.authorKnight, Marianen_GB
dc.contributor.authorLennox, Christopheren_GB
dc.contributor.authorMiller, Alisonen_GB
dc.contributor.authorParmar, Dharmishtaen_GB
dc.contributor.authorRogers, Janeen_GB
dc.contributor.authorSpringett, Annaen_GB
dc.date.accessioned2013-07-16T10:12:10Z-
dc.date.available2013-07-16T10:12:10Z-
dc.date.issued2011-03-
dc.identifier.citationSaving Mothers' Lives: Reviewing maternal deaths to make motherhood safer: 2006-2008. The Eighth Report of the Confidential Enquiries into Maternal Deaths in the United Kingdom. 2011, 118 Suppl 1:1-203 BJOGen_GB
dc.identifier.issn1471-0528-
dc.identifier.pmid21356004-
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1471-0528.2010.02847.x-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/296165-
dc.description.abstractIn the triennium 2006-2008, 261 women in the UK died directly or indirectly related to pregnancy. The overall maternal mortality rate was 11.39 per 100,000 maternities. Direct deaths decreased from 6.24 per 100,000 maternities in 2003-2005 to 4.67 per 100,000 maternities in 2006–2008 (p = 0.02). This decline is predominantly due to the reduction in deaths from thromboembolism and, to a lesser extent, haemorrhage. For the first time there has been a reduction in the inequalities gap, with a significant decrease in maternal mortality rates among those living in the most deprived areas and those in the lowest socio-economic group. Despite a decline in the overall UK maternal mortality rate, there has been an increase in deaths related to genital tract sepsis, particularly from community acquired Group A streptococcal disease. The mortality rate related to sepsis increased from 0.85 deaths per 100,000 maternities in 2003-2005 to 1.13 deaths in 2006-2008, and sepsis is now the most common cause of Direct maternal death. Cardiac disease is the most common cause of Indirect death; the Indirect maternal mortality rate has not changed significantly since 2003-2005. This Confidential Enquiry identified substandard care in 70% of Direct deaths and 55% of Indirect deaths. Many of the identified avoidable factors remain the same as those identified in previous Enquiries. Recommendations for improving care have been developed and are highlighted in this report. Implementing the Top ten recommendations should be prioritised in order to ensure the overall UK maternal mortality rate continues to decline.en_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherBJOG : an international journal of obstetrics and gynaecologyen_GB
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to BJOG : an international journal of obstetrics and gynaecologyen_GB
dc.subject.meshCounseling-
dc.subject.meshFemale-
dc.subject.meshGreat Britain-
dc.subject.meshHealth Status-
dc.subject.meshHumans-
dc.subject.meshMaternal Health Services-
dc.subject.meshMaternal Mortality-
dc.subject.meshPatient Care Team-
dc.subject.meshPractice Guidelines as Topic-
dc.subject.meshPreconception Care-
dc.subject.meshPregnancy-
dc.subject.meshPregnancy Complications-
dc.subject.meshPregnancy Outcome-
dc.subject.meshPrenatal Care-
dc.subject.meshQuality of Health Care-
dc.subject.meshReferral and Consultation-
dc.titleSaving Mothers' Lives: Reviewing maternal deaths to make motherhood safer: 2006-2008. The Eighth Report of the Confidential Enquiries into Maternal Deaths in the United Kingdom.en_GB
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalBJOG : an international journal of obstetrics and gynaecologyen_GB
dc.description.fundingNo fundingen
dc.description.provinceLeinsteren
dc.description.peer-reviewpeer-reviewen

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