Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/293374
Title:
Surgical checklists: the human factor
Authors:
O’Connor, Paul; Reddin, Catriona; O’Sullivan, Michael; O’Duffy, Fergal; Keogh, Ivan
Citation:
Patient Safety in Surgery. 2013 May 14;7(1):14
Journal:
Patient safety in surgery
Issue Date:
14-May-2013
URI:
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/1754-9493-7-14; http://hdl.handle.net/10147/293374
Abstract:
Abstract Background Surgical checklists has been shown to improve patient safety and teamwork in the operating theatre. However, despite the known benefits of the use of checklists in surgery, in some cases the practical implementation has been found to be less than universal. A questionnaire methodology was used to quantitatively evaluate the attitudes of theatre staff towards a modified version of the World Health Organisation (WHO) surgical checklist with relation to: beliefs about levels of compliance and support, impact on patient safety and teamwork, and barriers to the use of the checklist. Methods Using the theory of planned behaviour as a framework, 14 semi-structured interviews were conducted with theatre personnel regarding their attitudes towards, and levels of compliance with, a checklist. Based upon the interviews, a 27-item questionnaire was developed and distribute to all theatre personnel in an Irish hospital. Results Responses were obtained from 107 theatre staff (42.6% response rate). Particularly for nurses, the overall attitudes towards the effect of the checklist on safety and teamworking were positive. However, there was a lack of rigour with which the checklist was being applied. Nurses were significantly more sensitive to the barriers to the use of the checklist than anaesthetists or surgeons. Moreover, anaesthetists were not as positively disposed to the surgical checklist as surgeons and nurse. This finding was attributed to the tendency for the checklist to be completed during a period of high workload for the anaesthetists, resulting in a lack of engagement with the process. Conclusion In order to improve the rigour with which the surgical checklist is applied, there is a need for: the involvement of all members of the theatre team in the checklist process, demonstrated support for the checklist from senior personnel, on-going education and training, and barriers to the implementation of the checklist to be addressed.
Language:
en
Keywords:
PATIENT SAFETY; SURGERY

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorO’Connor, Paulen_GB
dc.contributor.authorReddin, Catrionaen_GB
dc.contributor.authorO’Sullivan, Michaelen_GB
dc.contributor.authorO’Duffy, Fergalen_GB
dc.contributor.authorKeogh, Ivanen_GB
dc.date.accessioned2013-06-04T14:16:17Z-
dc.date.available2013-06-04T14:16:17Z-
dc.date.issued2013-05-14-
dc.identifier.citationPatient Safety in Surgery. 2013 May 14;7(1):14en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1186/1754-9493-7-14-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/293374-
dc.description.abstractAbstract Background Surgical checklists has been shown to improve patient safety and teamwork in the operating theatre. However, despite the known benefits of the use of checklists in surgery, in some cases the practical implementation has been found to be less than universal. A questionnaire methodology was used to quantitatively evaluate the attitudes of theatre staff towards a modified version of the World Health Organisation (WHO) surgical checklist with relation to: beliefs about levels of compliance and support, impact on patient safety and teamwork, and barriers to the use of the checklist. Methods Using the theory of planned behaviour as a framework, 14 semi-structured interviews were conducted with theatre personnel regarding their attitudes towards, and levels of compliance with, a checklist. Based upon the interviews, a 27-item questionnaire was developed and distribute to all theatre personnel in an Irish hospital. Results Responses were obtained from 107 theatre staff (42.6% response rate). Particularly for nurses, the overall attitudes towards the effect of the checklist on safety and teamworking were positive. However, there was a lack of rigour with which the checklist was being applied. Nurses were significantly more sensitive to the barriers to the use of the checklist than anaesthetists or surgeons. Moreover, anaesthetists were not as positively disposed to the surgical checklist as surgeons and nurse. This finding was attributed to the tendency for the checklist to be completed during a period of high workload for the anaesthetists, resulting in a lack of engagement with the process. Conclusion In order to improve the rigour with which the surgical checklist is applied, there is a need for: the involvement of all members of the theatre team in the checklist process, demonstrated support for the checklist from senior personnel, on-going education and training, and barriers to the implementation of the checklist to be addressed.-
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subjectPATIENT SAFETYen_GB
dc.subjectSURGERYen_GB
dc.titleSurgical checklists: the human factoren_GB
dc.identifier.journalPatient safety in surgeryen_GB
dc.language.rfc3066en-
dc.rights.holderPaul O’Connor et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.-
dc.description.statusPeer Reviewed-
dc.date.updated2013-06-01T07:06:17Z-
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