Less stress, more success? Oncological implications of surgery-induced oxidative stress.

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/292749
Title:
Less stress, more success? Oncological implications of surgery-induced oxidative stress.
Authors:
O'Leary, D P; Wang, J H; Cotter, T G; Redmond, H P
Affiliation:
Department of Academic Surgery, Cork University Hospital, Cork, Ireland. donaloleary@rcsi.ie
Citation:
Less stress, more success? Oncological implications of surgery-induced oxidative stress. 2013, 62 (3):461-70 Gut
Journal:
Gut
Issue Date:
Mar-2013
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/292749
DOI:
10.1136/gutjnl-2011-300948
PubMed ID:
22147551
Abstract:
Reactive oxygen species (ROS) possess important cell signalling properties. This contradicts traditional thought which associated ROS activity with cell death. Emerging evidence clearly demonstrates that ROS signalling acts as a key regulator in tumour cell survival and in the cellular processes required for tumour cells to successfully metastasise and proliferate. The discovery of the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidase (Nox) family of enzymes in the last decade has unravelled much of the mystery surrounding how ROS are generated. Tumour cells are now known to express Nox enzymes which produce ROS required for cellular signalling. Activation of Nox enzymes occurs via interaction with proinflammatory cytokines and growth factors, all of which are released following surgical trauma. As our understanding of the signalling capabilities of ROS grows, the oncological implications of ROS activity are gradually being revealed. Nox-derived ROS are known to play a central role in each step of the metastatic cascade including invasion, adhesion, angiogenesis and proliferation. This article describes how surgery creates a ROS-rich environment, which facilitates redox signalling, and also examines the role played by Nox enzymes in this process. The authors then explore current knowledge of the oncological implications of surgery-induced redox signalling, and discuss current and future therapeutic strategies targeted at ROS and Nox enzymes in cancer patients.
Item Type:
Article
Language:
en
MeSH:
Digestive System Surgical Procedures; Drug Delivery Systems; Gastrointestinal Neoplasms; Humans; Oxidation-Reduction; Oxidative Stress; Reactive Oxygen Species; Signal Transduction
ISSN:
1468-3288

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorO'Leary, D Pen_GB
dc.contributor.authorWang, J Hen_GB
dc.contributor.authorCotter, T Gen_GB
dc.contributor.authorRedmond, H Pen_GB
dc.date.accessioned2013-05-24T14:32:37Z-
dc.date.available2013-05-24T14:32:37Z-
dc.date.issued2013-03-
dc.identifier.citationLess stress, more success? Oncological implications of surgery-induced oxidative stress. 2013, 62 (3):461-70 Guten_GB
dc.identifier.issn1468-3288-
dc.identifier.pmid22147551-
dc.identifier.doi10.1136/gutjnl-2011-300948-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/292749-
dc.description.abstractReactive oxygen species (ROS) possess important cell signalling properties. This contradicts traditional thought which associated ROS activity with cell death. Emerging evidence clearly demonstrates that ROS signalling acts as a key regulator in tumour cell survival and in the cellular processes required for tumour cells to successfully metastasise and proliferate. The discovery of the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidase (Nox) family of enzymes in the last decade has unravelled much of the mystery surrounding how ROS are generated. Tumour cells are now known to express Nox enzymes which produce ROS required for cellular signalling. Activation of Nox enzymes occurs via interaction with proinflammatory cytokines and growth factors, all of which are released following surgical trauma. As our understanding of the signalling capabilities of ROS grows, the oncological implications of ROS activity are gradually being revealed. Nox-derived ROS are known to play a central role in each step of the metastatic cascade including invasion, adhesion, angiogenesis and proliferation. This article describes how surgery creates a ROS-rich environment, which facilitates redox signalling, and also examines the role played by Nox enzymes in this process. The authors then explore current knowledge of the oncological implications of surgery-induced redox signalling, and discuss current and future therapeutic strategies targeted at ROS and Nox enzymes in cancer patients.en_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Guten_GB
dc.subject.meshDigestive System Surgical Procedures-
dc.subject.meshDrug Delivery Systems-
dc.subject.meshGastrointestinal Neoplasms-
dc.subject.meshHumans-
dc.subject.meshOxidation-Reduction-
dc.subject.meshOxidative Stress-
dc.subject.meshReactive Oxygen Species-
dc.subject.meshSignal Transduction-
dc.titleLess stress, more success? Oncological implications of surgery-induced oxidative stress.en_GB
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Academic Surgery, Cork University Hospital, Cork, Ireland. donaloleary@rcsi.ieen_GB
dc.identifier.journalGuten_GB
dc.description.provinceMunsteren
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