Leptospirosis: a globally increasing zoonotic disease.

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/292747
Title:
Leptospirosis: a globally increasing zoonotic disease.
Authors:
Rock, Clare; Brady, Deirdre; Forde, Patrick; Lucey, Patricia; Horgan, Mary
Affiliation:
Department of Infectious Diseases, Cork University Hospital, Cork, Ireland. clarerock@hotmail.com
Citation:
Leptospirosis: a globally increasing zoonotic disease. 2010, 2010: BMJ Case Rep
Journal:
BMJ case reports
Issue Date:
2010
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/292747
DOI:
10.1136/bcr.04.2010.2947
PubMed ID:
22791852
Additional Links:
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3029442/
Abstract:
A 27-year-old previously healthy man was admitted to the intensive care unit with severe jaundice, dyspnoea with haemoptysis, anaemia, thrombocytopenia and acute renal injury. He had no recent history of foreign travel but had been building a shed in his back garden in Cork, Ireland, for the preceding week. The patient's history, clinical observations, haematological and radiological results were all consistent with icteric leptospirosis or Weil's disease. This was confirmed on serological testing. He completed 7 days intravenous ceftriaxone and made a complete recovery. While endemic in tropical climates, leptospirosis incidence is increasing in temperate climates. Recent cases seen in temperate climates can be severe, particularly with pulmonary manifestations. The report of this case serves to increase awareness of this re-emerging potentially fatal infectious disease.
Item Type:
Article
Language:
en
MeSH:
Adult; Animals; Humans; Male; Rats; Weil Disease; Zoonoses
ISSN:
1757-790X

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorRock, Clareen_GB
dc.contributor.authorBrady, Deirdreen_GB
dc.contributor.authorForde, Patricken_GB
dc.contributor.authorLucey, Patriciaen_GB
dc.contributor.authorHorgan, Maryen_GB
dc.date.accessioned2013-05-24T14:13:58Z-
dc.date.available2013-05-24T14:13:58Z-
dc.date.issued2010-
dc.identifier.citationLeptospirosis: a globally increasing zoonotic disease. 2010, 2010: BMJ Case Repen_GB
dc.identifier.issn1757-790X-
dc.identifier.pmid22791852-
dc.identifier.doi10.1136/bcr.04.2010.2947-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/292747-
dc.description.abstractA 27-year-old previously healthy man was admitted to the intensive care unit with severe jaundice, dyspnoea with haemoptysis, anaemia, thrombocytopenia and acute renal injury. He had no recent history of foreign travel but had been building a shed in his back garden in Cork, Ireland, for the preceding week. The patient's history, clinical observations, haematological and radiological results were all consistent with icteric leptospirosis or Weil's disease. This was confirmed on serological testing. He completed 7 days intravenous ceftriaxone and made a complete recovery. While endemic in tropical climates, leptospirosis incidence is increasing in temperate climates. Recent cases seen in temperate climates can be severe, particularly with pulmonary manifestations. The report of this case serves to increase awareness of this re-emerging potentially fatal infectious disease.en_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3029442/en_GB
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to BMJ case reportsen_GB
dc.subject.meshAdult-
dc.subject.meshAnimals-
dc.subject.meshHumans-
dc.subject.meshMale-
dc.subject.meshRats-
dc.subject.meshWeil Disease-
dc.subject.meshZoonoses-
dc.titleLeptospirosis: a globally increasing zoonotic disease.en_GB
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Infectious Diseases, Cork University Hospital, Cork, Ireland. clarerock@hotmail.comen_GB
dc.identifier.journalBMJ case reportsen_GB
dc.description.provinceMunsteren

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