Impact of family history and depression on amygdala volume.

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/292580
Title:
Impact of family history and depression on amygdala volume.
Authors:
Saleh, Karim; Carballedo, Angela; Lisiecka, Danutia; Fagan, Andrew J; Connolly, Gerald; Boyle, Gerard; Frodl, Thomas
Affiliation:
Department of Psychiatry St. James's Hospital and Adelaide and Meath Hospital incorporating the National Children's Hospital, Trinity College Dublin, Ireland.
Citation:
Impact of family history and depression on amygdala volume. 2012, 203 (1):24-30 Psychiatry Res
Journal:
Psychiatry research
Issue Date:
30-Jul-2012
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/292580
DOI:
10.1016/j.pscychresns.2011.10.004
PubMed ID:
22867951
Abstract:
Family history of depression significantly impacts life-long depression risk. Family history could impact the stress and emotion regulation system that involves the amygdala. This study's purpose was to investigate family history's effect on amygdala volumes, and differences in first degree relatives with and without major depressive disorder (MDD). Participants, aged 18-65, were healthy volunteers (N=52) with (n=26) and without (n=26) first degree family history, and patients with MDD (N=48) with (n=27) and without (n=21)first-degree family history recruited for structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Participants underwent clinical assessment followed by manual amygdala tracing. Patients with MDD without family history showed significantly larger right amygdala without a family history of MDD. These effects had larger right amygdala than healthy controls without MDD family history. These effects were pronounced in females. Family history and gender impacted amygdala volumes in all participants, providing a rationale for the inconsistent results in MDD amygdala studies. Higher familial risk in depression seems to be associated with smaller amygdala volumes, whereas depression alone is associated with larger amygdala volumes. Ultimately, these findings highlight consideration of family history and gender in research and treatment strategies.
Item Type:
Article
Language:
en
MeSH:
Adult; Amygdala; Case-Control Studies; Depressive Disorder, Major; Family; Female; Functional Laterality; Humans; Magnetic Resonance Imaging; Male; Middle Aged; Organ Size; Risk Factors; Sex Factors
ISSN:
1872-7123

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorSaleh, Karimen_GB
dc.contributor.authorCarballedo, Angelaen_GB
dc.contributor.authorLisiecka, Danutiaen_GB
dc.contributor.authorFagan, Andrew Jen_GB
dc.contributor.authorConnolly, Geralden_GB
dc.contributor.authorBoyle, Gerarden_GB
dc.contributor.authorFrodl, Thomasen_GB
dc.date.accessioned2013-05-21T14:16:45Z-
dc.date.available2013-05-21T14:16:45Z-
dc.date.issued2012-07-30-
dc.identifier.citationImpact of family history and depression on amygdala volume. 2012, 203 (1):24-30 Psychiatry Resen_GB
dc.identifier.issn1872-7123-
dc.identifier.pmid22867951-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.pscychresns.2011.10.004-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/292580-
dc.description.abstractFamily history of depression significantly impacts life-long depression risk. Family history could impact the stress and emotion regulation system that involves the amygdala. This study's purpose was to investigate family history's effect on amygdala volumes, and differences in first degree relatives with and without major depressive disorder (MDD). Participants, aged 18-65, were healthy volunteers (N=52) with (n=26) and without (n=26) first degree family history, and patients with MDD (N=48) with (n=27) and without (n=21)first-degree family history recruited for structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Participants underwent clinical assessment followed by manual amygdala tracing. Patients with MDD without family history showed significantly larger right amygdala without a family history of MDD. These effects had larger right amygdala than healthy controls without MDD family history. These effects were pronounced in females. Family history and gender impacted amygdala volumes in all participants, providing a rationale for the inconsistent results in MDD amygdala studies. Higher familial risk in depression seems to be associated with smaller amygdala volumes, whereas depression alone is associated with larger amygdala volumes. Ultimately, these findings highlight consideration of family history and gender in research and treatment strategies.en_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Psychiatry researchen_GB
dc.subject.meshAdult-
dc.subject.meshAmygdala-
dc.subject.meshCase-Control Studies-
dc.subject.meshDepressive Disorder, Major-
dc.subject.meshFamily-
dc.subject.meshFemale-
dc.subject.meshFunctional Laterality-
dc.subject.meshHumans-
dc.subject.meshMagnetic Resonance Imaging-
dc.subject.meshMale-
dc.subject.meshMiddle Aged-
dc.subject.meshOrgan Size-
dc.subject.meshRisk Factors-
dc.subject.meshSex Factors-
dc.titleImpact of family history and depression on amygdala volume.en_GB
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Psychiatry St. James's Hospital and Adelaide and Meath Hospital incorporating the National Children's Hospital, Trinity College Dublin, Ireland.en_GB
dc.identifier.journalPsychiatry researchen_GB
dc.description.provinceLeinsteren

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