Maternal nutrition among women from Sub-Saharan Africa, with a focus on Nigeria, and potential implications for pregnancy outcomes among immigrant populations in developed countries.

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/292265
Title:
Maternal nutrition among women from Sub-Saharan Africa, with a focus on Nigeria, and potential implications for pregnancy outcomes among immigrant populations in developed countries.
Authors:
Lindsay, K L; Gibney, E R; McAuliffe, F M
Affiliation:
UCD Obstetrics and Gynaecology, School of Medicine and Medical Science, National Maternity Hospital, Dublin 2, Ireland.
Citation:
Maternal nutrition among women from Sub-Saharan Africa, with a focus on Nigeria, and potential implications for pregnancy outcomes among immigrant populations in developed countries. 2012, 25 (6):534-46 J Hum Nutr Diet
Journal:
Journal of human nutrition and dietetics : the official journal of the British Dietetic Association
Issue Date:
Dec-2012
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/292265
DOI:
10.1111/j.1365-277X.2012.01253.x
PubMed ID:
22594552
Abstract:
Pregnant women in countries of Sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) are at risk of poor nutritional status and adverse outcomes as a result of poverty, food insecurity, sub-optimal healthcare facilities, frequent infections and frequent pregnancies. Studies from Nigeria, for example, have revealed a high prevalence of both under- and over-nutrition, as well as nutrient deficiencies, including iron, folate, vitamin D and vitamin A. Subsequently, obstetric complications, including hypertension, anaemia, neural tube defects, night-blindness, low birth weight and maternal and perinatal mortality, are common. Migration patterns from SSA to the Western world are on the rise in recent years, with Nigerians now representing the most prevalent immigrant African population in many developed countries. However, the effect of immigration, if any, on the nutritional status and pregnancy outcomes of these women in their host countries has not yet been studied. Consequently, it is unknown to what extent the nutritional deficiencies and pregnancy complications occurring in Nigeria, and other countries of SSA, present in these women post-emigration. This may result in missed opportunities for appropriate antenatal care of a potential high-risk group in pregnancy. The present review discusses the literature regarding nutrition in pregnancy among SSA women, using Nigeria as an example, the common nutrition-related complications that arise and the subsequent obstetric outcomes. The concept of dietary acculturation among immigrant groups is also discussed and deficiencies in the literature regarding studies on the diets of pregnant immigrant women are highlighted.
Item Type:
Article
Language:
en
MeSH:
Africa South of the Sahara; Developed Countries; Diet; Emigration and Immigration; Female; Humans; Malnutrition; Maternal Nutritional Physiological Phenomena; Nigeria; Nutritional Status; Pregnancy; Pregnancy Complications; Pregnancy Outcome; Prenatal Care
ISSN:
1365-277X

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorLindsay, K Len_GB
dc.contributor.authorGibney, E Ren_GB
dc.contributor.authorMcAuliffe, F Men_GB
dc.date.accessioned2013-05-16T15:09:44Z-
dc.date.available2013-05-16T15:09:44Z-
dc.date.issued2012-12-
dc.identifier.citationMaternal nutrition among women from Sub-Saharan Africa, with a focus on Nigeria, and potential implications for pregnancy outcomes among immigrant populations in developed countries. 2012, 25 (6):534-46 J Hum Nutr Dieten_GB
dc.identifier.issn1365-277X-
dc.identifier.pmid22594552-
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1365-277X.2012.01253.x-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/292265-
dc.description.abstractPregnant women in countries of Sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) are at risk of poor nutritional status and adverse outcomes as a result of poverty, food insecurity, sub-optimal healthcare facilities, frequent infections and frequent pregnancies. Studies from Nigeria, for example, have revealed a high prevalence of both under- and over-nutrition, as well as nutrient deficiencies, including iron, folate, vitamin D and vitamin A. Subsequently, obstetric complications, including hypertension, anaemia, neural tube defects, night-blindness, low birth weight and maternal and perinatal mortality, are common. Migration patterns from SSA to the Western world are on the rise in recent years, with Nigerians now representing the most prevalent immigrant African population in many developed countries. However, the effect of immigration, if any, on the nutritional status and pregnancy outcomes of these women in their host countries has not yet been studied. Consequently, it is unknown to what extent the nutritional deficiencies and pregnancy complications occurring in Nigeria, and other countries of SSA, present in these women post-emigration. This may result in missed opportunities for appropriate antenatal care of a potential high-risk group in pregnancy. The present review discusses the literature regarding nutrition in pregnancy among SSA women, using Nigeria as an example, the common nutrition-related complications that arise and the subsequent obstetric outcomes. The concept of dietary acculturation among immigrant groups is also discussed and deficiencies in the literature regarding studies on the diets of pregnant immigrant women are highlighted.en_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Journal of human nutrition and dietetics : the official journal of the British Dietetic Associationen_GB
dc.subject.meshAfrica South of the Sahara-
dc.subject.meshDeveloped Countries-
dc.subject.meshDiet-
dc.subject.meshEmigration and Immigration-
dc.subject.meshFemale-
dc.subject.meshHumans-
dc.subject.meshMalnutrition-
dc.subject.meshMaternal Nutritional Physiological Phenomena-
dc.subject.meshNigeria-
dc.subject.meshNutritional Status-
dc.subject.meshPregnancy-
dc.subject.meshPregnancy Complications-
dc.subject.meshPregnancy Outcome-
dc.subject.meshPrenatal Care-
dc.titleMaternal nutrition among women from Sub-Saharan Africa, with a focus on Nigeria, and potential implications for pregnancy outcomes among immigrant populations in developed countries.en_GB
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUCD Obstetrics and Gynaecology, School of Medicine and Medical Science, National Maternity Hospital, Dublin 2, Ireland.en_GB
dc.identifier.journalJournal of human nutrition and dietetics : the official journal of the British Dietetic Associationen_GB
dc.description.provinceLeinsteren
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