HSE Global Health and ESTHER Alliance - report on staff survey

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/290797
Title:
HSE Global Health and ESTHER Alliance - report on staff survey
Authors:
Fitzpatrick, Gabriel
Publisher:
Health Service Executive (HSE)
Issue Date:
Jan-2013
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/290797
Additional Links:
http://www.hse.ie/eng/about/Who/qualityandpatientsafety/globalhealth/GlobalHealthProgrammeSurvey2013.pdf
Item Type:
Report
Language:
en
Description:
Executive Summary In 2012 Ireland officially became a member of the European ESTHER Alliance, a network which facilitates partnerships between European and developing world healthcare institutions. Consequently, that same year, the HSE’s Global Health Programme undertook an internet based survey of health service personnel to quantify their experience and interest in linking with developing world organisations. The survey specifically requested responses on how Irish healthcare institutions could create effective and sustainable partnerships with similar ones in the developing world. A total of 1,028 persons completed the web based survey. It was recognised that it was not possible to contact all staff via email to notify them about the survey, particularly hospital staff and those who work in General Practice. The largest group of respondents were medical personnel followed closely by allied health professionals and nursing staff. Approximately one quarter of participants had previous experience of working in the developing world, mostly with NGOs or Mission organisations. The survey documented that the majority of this experience was for 12 months or less duration, however 89 respondents have spent 2 or more years working overseas in developing countries. Projects that HSE staff have been involved with cover a wide range of disciplines. Specific examples include; assisting with telecommunications in the Pacific Islands, setting up a paediatric oncology unit in Dar es Salaam, providing medical support to AIDS patients in Uganda and assisting schools in rural Pakistan. Interestingly, the majority of respondents (59%) did not know if their organisation provided any support to developing world institutions. Where assistance was provided it was usually in the form of donated equipment. Contributors to the survey overwhelmingly (69%) supported becoming involved in ESTHER Alliance partnerships. This support from staff will be crucial if Irish institutions are to form sustainable links with developing world organisations. 5 Respondents provided a rich framework of ideas for creating and strengthening partnerships. These included the use of the internet as a means of sharing knowledge, joint scientific research for advancing patient care and the creation of registries to indicate what certain institutions can offer while highlighting what other institutions need. The importance of reciprocal staff training and having partnerships built on mutual respect was repeatedly emphasised. Very few negative comments were received regarding the HSE’s Global Health Programme/ESTHER Alliance. Overall the survey documents that there is broad support for linking similar Irish and developing world health care institutions. The challenge for the HSE’s Global Health Programme is to translate this good will into meaningful partnerships that benefit both Ireland and the developing world nations.
Local subject classification:
PUBLIC HEALTH DEPARTMENT; ENVIRONMENT AND HEALTH; PUBLIC INFORMATION; GLOBAL HEALTH

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorFitzpatrick, Gabrielen_GB
dc.date.accessioned2013-05-10T10:58:25Z-
dc.date.available2013-05-10T10:58:25Z-
dc.date.issued2013-01-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/290797-
dc.descriptionExecutive Summary In 2012 Ireland officially became a member of the European ESTHER Alliance, a network which facilitates partnerships between European and developing world healthcare institutions. Consequently, that same year, the HSE’s Global Health Programme undertook an internet based survey of health service personnel to quantify their experience and interest in linking with developing world organisations. The survey specifically requested responses on how Irish healthcare institutions could create effective and sustainable partnerships with similar ones in the developing world. A total of 1,028 persons completed the web based survey. It was recognised that it was not possible to contact all staff via email to notify them about the survey, particularly hospital staff and those who work in General Practice. The largest group of respondents were medical personnel followed closely by allied health professionals and nursing staff. Approximately one quarter of participants had previous experience of working in the developing world, mostly with NGOs or Mission organisations. The survey documented that the majority of this experience was for 12 months or less duration, however 89 respondents have spent 2 or more years working overseas in developing countries. Projects that HSE staff have been involved with cover a wide range of disciplines. Specific examples include; assisting with telecommunications in the Pacific Islands, setting up a paediatric oncology unit in Dar es Salaam, providing medical support to AIDS patients in Uganda and assisting schools in rural Pakistan. Interestingly, the majority of respondents (59%) did not know if their organisation provided any support to developing world institutions. Where assistance was provided it was usually in the form of donated equipment. Contributors to the survey overwhelmingly (69%) supported becoming involved in ESTHER Alliance partnerships. This support from staff will be crucial if Irish institutions are to form sustainable links with developing world organisations. 5 Respondents provided a rich framework of ideas for creating and strengthening partnerships. These included the use of the internet as a means of sharing knowledge, joint scientific research for advancing patient care and the creation of registries to indicate what certain institutions can offer while highlighting what other institutions need. The importance of reciprocal staff training and having partnerships built on mutual respect was repeatedly emphasised. Very few negative comments were received regarding the HSE’s Global Health Programme/ESTHER Alliance. Overall the survey documents that there is broad support for linking similar Irish and developing world health care institutions. The challenge for the HSE’s Global Health Programme is to translate this good will into meaningful partnerships that benefit both Ireland and the developing world nations.en_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherHealth Service Executive (HSE)en_GB
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.hse.ie/eng/about/Who/qualityandpatientsafety/globalhealth/GlobalHealthProgrammeSurvey2013.pdfen_GB
dc.subject.otherPUBLIC HEALTH DEPARTMENTen_GB
dc.subject.otherENVIRONMENT AND HEALTHen_GB
dc.subject.otherPUBLIC INFORMATIONen_GB
dc.subject.otherGLOBAL HEALTH-
dc.titleHSE Global Health and ESTHER Alliance - report on staff surveyen_GB
dc.typeReporten
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