Insights into the role of macrophage migration inhibitory factor in obesity and insulin resistance.

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/281373
Title:
Insights into the role of macrophage migration inhibitory factor in obesity and insulin resistance.
Authors:
Finucane, Orla M; Reynolds, Clare M; McGillicuddy, Fiona C; Roche, Helen M
Affiliation:
Insitiute of Molecular Medicine, School of Medicine, Trinity Centre for Health Sciences, St James Hospital, Dublin 8, Republic of Ireland.
Citation:
Insights into the role of macrophage migration inhibitory factor in obesity and insulin resistance. 2012, 71 (4):622-33 Proc Nutr Soc
Publisher:
Cambridge Journals
Journal:
The Proceedings of the Nutrition Society
Issue Date:
Nov-2012
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/281373
DOI:
10.1017/S0029665112000730
PubMed ID:
22914223
Abstract:
High-fat diet (HFD)-induced obesity has emerged as a state of chronic low-grade inflammation characterised by a progressive infiltration of immune cells, particularly macrophages, into obese adipose tissue. Adipose tissue macrophages (ATM) present immense plasticity. In early obesity, M2 anti-inflammatory macrophages acquire an M1 pro-inflammatory phenotype. Pro-inflammatory cytokines including TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-1β produced by M1 ATM exacerbate local inflammation promoting insulin resistance (IR), which consequently, can lead to type-2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). However, the triggers responsible for ATM recruitment and activation are not fully understood. Adipose tissue-derived chemokines are significant players in driving ATM recruitment during obesity. Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF), a chemokine-like inflammatory regulator, is enhanced during obesity and is directly associated with the degree of peripheral IR. This review focuses on the functional role of macrophages in obesity-induced IR and highlights the importance of the unique inflammatory cytokine MIF in propagating obesity-induced inflammation and IR. Given MIF chemotactic properties, MIF may be a primary candidate promoting ATM recruitment during obesity. Manipulating MIF inflammatory activities in obesity, using pharmacological agents or functional foods, may be therapeutically beneficial for the treatment and prevention of obesity-related metabolic diseases.
Item Type:
Article
Language:
en
MeSH:
Adipose Tissue; Chemotaxis; Diet, High-Fat; Humans; Inflammation; Insulin Resistance; Macrophage Migration-Inhibitory Factors; Macrophages; Obesity
ISSN:
0029-6651

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorFinucane, Orla Men_GB
dc.contributor.authorReynolds, Clare Men_GB
dc.contributor.authorMcGillicuddy, Fiona Cen_GB
dc.contributor.authorRoche, Helen Men_GB
dc.date.accessioned2013-04-16T08:53:11Z-
dc.date.available2013-04-16T08:53:11Z-
dc.date.issued2012-11-
dc.identifier.citationInsights into the role of macrophage migration inhibitory factor in obesity and insulin resistance. 2012, 71 (4):622-33 Proc Nutr Socen_GB
dc.identifier.issn0029-6651-
dc.identifier.pmid22914223-
dc.identifier.doi10.1017/S0029665112000730-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/281373-
dc.description.abstractHigh-fat diet (HFD)-induced obesity has emerged as a state of chronic low-grade inflammation characterised by a progressive infiltration of immune cells, particularly macrophages, into obese adipose tissue. Adipose tissue macrophages (ATM) present immense plasticity. In early obesity, M2 anti-inflammatory macrophages acquire an M1 pro-inflammatory phenotype. Pro-inflammatory cytokines including TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-1β produced by M1 ATM exacerbate local inflammation promoting insulin resistance (IR), which consequently, can lead to type-2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). However, the triggers responsible for ATM recruitment and activation are not fully understood. Adipose tissue-derived chemokines are significant players in driving ATM recruitment during obesity. Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF), a chemokine-like inflammatory regulator, is enhanced during obesity and is directly associated with the degree of peripheral IR. This review focuses on the functional role of macrophages in obesity-induced IR and highlights the importance of the unique inflammatory cytokine MIF in propagating obesity-induced inflammation and IR. Given MIF chemotactic properties, MIF may be a primary candidate promoting ATM recruitment during obesity. Manipulating MIF inflammatory activities in obesity, using pharmacological agents or functional foods, may be therapeutically beneficial for the treatment and prevention of obesity-related metabolic diseases.en_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherCambridge Journalsen_GB
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to The Proceedings of the Nutrition Societyen_GB
dc.subject.meshAdipose Tissue-
dc.subject.meshChemotaxis-
dc.subject.meshDiet, High-Fat-
dc.subject.meshHumans-
dc.subject.meshInflammation-
dc.subject.meshInsulin Resistance-
dc.subject.meshMacrophage Migration-Inhibitory Factors-
dc.subject.meshMacrophages-
dc.subject.meshObesity-
dc.titleInsights into the role of macrophage migration inhibitory factor in obesity and insulin resistance.en_GB
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentInsitiute of Molecular Medicine, School of Medicine, Trinity Centre for Health Sciences, St James Hospital, Dublin 8, Republic of Ireland.en_GB
dc.identifier.journalThe Proceedings of the Nutrition Societyen_GB
dc.description.provinceLeinsteren
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