Symptom overlap in anxiety and multiple sclerosis.

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/275935
Title:
Symptom overlap in anxiety and multiple sclerosis.
Authors:
O Donnchadha, Seán; Burke, Teresa; Bramham, Jessica; O'Brien, Marie Claire; Whelan, Robert; Reilly, Richard; Kiiski, Hanni; Lonergan, Róisín; Kinsella, Katie; Kelly, Siobhán; McGuigan, Christopher; Hutchinson, Michael; Tubridy, Niall
Affiliation:
School of Psychology, University College Dublin, Ireland.
Citation:
Symptom overlap in anxiety and multiple sclerosis. 2013: Mult. Scler.
Journal:
Multiple sclerosis (Houndmills, Basingstoke, England)
Issue Date:
14-Feb-2013
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/275935
DOI:
10.1177/1352458513476742
PubMed ID:
23413298
Abstract:
BACKGROUND: The validity of self-rated anxiety inventories in people with multiple sclerosis (pwMS) is unclear. However, the appropriateness of self-reported depression scales has been widely examined. Given somatic symptom overlap between depression and MS, research emphasises caution when using such scales. OBJECTIVE: This study evaluates symptom overlap between anxiety and MS in a group of 33 individuals with MS, using the Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI). METHODS: Participants underwent a neurological examination and completed the BAI. RESULTS: A novel procedure using hierarchical cluster analysis revealed three distinct symptom clusters. Cluster one ('wobbliness' and 'unsteady') grouped separately from all other BAI items. These symptoms are well-recognised MS-related symptoms and we question whether their endorsement in pwMS can be considered to reflect anxiety. A modified 19-item BAI (mBAI) was created which excludes cluster one items. This removal reduced the number of MS participants considered 'anxious' by 21.21% (low threshold) and altered the level of anxiety severity for a further 27.27%. CONCLUSION: Based on these data, it is suggested that, as with depression measures, researchers and clinicians should exercise caution when using brief screening measures for anxiety in pwMS.
Item Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
1477-0970

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorO Donnchadha, Seánen_GB
dc.contributor.authorBurke, Teresaen_GB
dc.contributor.authorBramham, Jessicaen_GB
dc.contributor.authorO'Brien, Marie Claireen_GB
dc.contributor.authorWhelan, Roberten_GB
dc.contributor.authorReilly, Richarden_GB
dc.contributor.authorKiiski, Hannien_GB
dc.contributor.authorLonergan, Róisínen_GB
dc.contributor.authorKinsella, Katieen_GB
dc.contributor.authorKelly, Siobhánen_GB
dc.contributor.authorMcGuigan, Christopheren_GB
dc.contributor.authorHutchinson, Michaelen_GB
dc.contributor.authorTubridy, Niallen_GB
dc.date.accessioned2013-03-25T17:01:17Z-
dc.date.available2013-03-25T17:01:17Z-
dc.date.issued2013-02-14-
dc.identifier.citationSymptom overlap in anxiety and multiple sclerosis. 2013: Mult. Scler.en_GB
dc.identifier.issn1477-0970-
dc.identifier.pmid23413298-
dc.identifier.doi10.1177/1352458513476742-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/275935-
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND: The validity of self-rated anxiety inventories in people with multiple sclerosis (pwMS) is unclear. However, the appropriateness of self-reported depression scales has been widely examined. Given somatic symptom overlap between depression and MS, research emphasises caution when using such scales. OBJECTIVE: This study evaluates symptom overlap between anxiety and MS in a group of 33 individuals with MS, using the Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI). METHODS: Participants underwent a neurological examination and completed the BAI. RESULTS: A novel procedure using hierarchical cluster analysis revealed three distinct symptom clusters. Cluster one ('wobbliness' and 'unsteady') grouped separately from all other BAI items. These symptoms are well-recognised MS-related symptoms and we question whether their endorsement in pwMS can be considered to reflect anxiety. A modified 19-item BAI (mBAI) was created which excludes cluster one items. This removal reduced the number of MS participants considered 'anxious' by 21.21% (low threshold) and altered the level of anxiety severity for a further 27.27%. CONCLUSION: Based on these data, it is suggested that, as with depression measures, researchers and clinicians should exercise caution when using brief screening measures for anxiety in pwMS.-
dc.languageENG-
dc.language.isoenen
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Multiple sclerosis (Houndmills, Basingstoke, England)en_GB
dc.titleSymptom overlap in anxiety and multiple sclerosis.en_GB
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentSchool of Psychology, University College Dublin, Ireland.en_GB
dc.identifier.journalMultiple sclerosis (Houndmills, Basingstoke, England)en_GB

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