Exploring the challenges of implementing the Edmonton Symptom Assessment Scale in a specialist palliative care unit

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/271663
Title:
Exploring the challenges of implementing the Edmonton Symptom Assessment Scale in a specialist palliative care unit
Authors:
Lucey, M; Conroy, M; Ryan, K
Affiliation:
Milford Care Centre, Limerick; St Francis Hospice, Dublin
Citation:
Exploring the Challenges of Implementing the Edmonton Symptom Assessment Scale in a Specialist Palliative Care Unit 2012, 02 (06) Journal of Palliative Care & Medicine
Publisher:
OMICS
Journal:
Journal of Palliative Care & Medicine
Issue Date:
11-Mar-2013
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/271663
DOI:
10.4172/2165-7386.1000128
Additional Links:
http://www.omicsgroup.org/journals/2165-7386/2165-7386-2-128.digital/2165-7386-2-128.html
Item Type:
Article
Language:
en
Description:
Abstract Background: Many symptom assessment tools have been developed to aid evaluation of patient’s symptoms. The Edmonton Symptom Assessment Scale is one such tool. The ESAS was introduced on the inpatient unit in Milford Hospice (a 30 bedded tertiary palliative care unit) in December 2007. However, a 3-month chart review revealed a low completion rate (20%) of the ESAS. Aim: The aim of this study was to assess the reasons for the low completion rate of the ESAS in the unit. Methods: A mixed methods approach using both questionnaire and focus group was undertaken. The population sampled was the nursing staff who were responsible for ensuring the completion of the ESAS in the unit on a daily basis. Results: The main reason for the low completion rate of the ESAS was that nursing staff perceived that it was too burdensome for sick patients to complete (76%). Also, nursing staff felt that the tool was not clinically helpful and that it was too time consuming for patients to regularly complete. Other important issues relating to the introduction process for symptom assessment tools are also identified. Conclusions: The results of this study are consistent with findings in the literature relating to other symptom assessment tools. Implementing such tools may be burdensome for patients with a poor functional status in an advanced cancer setting. Areas of focus for further research include shorter symptom assessment tools which are more reflective of a patients twenty four hour symptom profile, and also proxy rated assessment tools.
Keywords:
PALLIATIVE CARE
Local subject classification:
SYMPTOM MANAGEMENT
ISSN:
21657386

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorLucey, Men_GB
dc.contributor.authorConroy, Men_GB
dc.contributor.authorRyan, Ken_GB
dc.date.accessioned2013-03-11T12:55:25Z-
dc.date.available2013-03-11T12:55:25Z-
dc.date.issued2013-03-11-
dc.identifier.citationExploring the Challenges of Implementing the Edmonton Symptom Assessment Scale in a Specialist Palliative Care Unit 2012, 02 (06) Journal of Palliative Care & Medicineen_GB
dc.identifier.issn21657386-
dc.identifier.doi10.4172/2165-7386.1000128-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/271663-
dc.descriptionAbstract Background: Many symptom assessment tools have been developed to aid evaluation of patient’s symptoms. The Edmonton Symptom Assessment Scale is one such tool. The ESAS was introduced on the inpatient unit in Milford Hospice (a 30 bedded tertiary palliative care unit) in December 2007. However, a 3-month chart review revealed a low completion rate (20%) of the ESAS. Aim: The aim of this study was to assess the reasons for the low completion rate of the ESAS in the unit. Methods: A mixed methods approach using both questionnaire and focus group was undertaken. The population sampled was the nursing staff who were responsible for ensuring the completion of the ESAS in the unit on a daily basis. Results: The main reason for the low completion rate of the ESAS was that nursing staff perceived that it was too burdensome for sick patients to complete (76%). Also, nursing staff felt that the tool was not clinically helpful and that it was too time consuming for patients to regularly complete. Other important issues relating to the introduction process for symptom assessment tools are also identified. Conclusions: The results of this study are consistent with findings in the literature relating to other symptom assessment tools. Implementing such tools may be burdensome for patients with a poor functional status in an advanced cancer setting. Areas of focus for further research include shorter symptom assessment tools which are more reflective of a patients twenty four hour symptom profile, and also proxy rated assessment tools.en_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherOMICSen_GB
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.omicsgroup.org/journals/2165-7386/2165-7386-2-128.digital/2165-7386-2-128.htmlen_GB
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Journal of Palliative Care & Medicineen_GB
dc.subjectPALLIATIVE CAREen_GB
dc.subject.otherSYMPTOM MANAGEMENTen_GB
dc.titleExploring the challenges of implementing the Edmonton Symptom Assessment Scale in a specialist palliative care uniten_GB
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentMilford Care Centre, Limerick; St Francis Hospice, Dublinen_GB
dc.identifier.journalJournal of Palliative Care & Medicineen_GB
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