Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/271661
Title:
Quality-of-life assessment in advanced cancer.
Authors:
Donnelly, S
Affiliation:
Milford Care Centre, Plassey Park Road, Castletroy, Limerick, Ireland. milford@milfordcare.ie
Citation:
Quality-of-life assessment in advanced cancer. 2000, 2 (4):338-42 Curr Oncol Rep
Journal:
Current oncology reports
Issue Date:
Jul-2000
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/271661
PubMed ID:
11122862
Abstract:
In the past 5 years, quality-of-life (QOL) assessment measures such as the McGill, McMaster, Global Visual Analogue Scale, Assessment of QOL at the End of Life, Life Evaluation Questionnaire, and Hospice QOL Index have been devised specifically for patients with advanced cancer. The developers of these instruments have tried to respond to the changing needs of this specific population, taking into account characteristics including poor performance status, difficulty with longitudinal study, rapidly deteriorating physical condition, and change in relevant issues. Emphasis has been placed on patient report, ease and speed of completion, and the existential domain or meaning of life. Novel techniques in QOL measurement have also been adapted for palliative care, such as judgment analysis in the Schedule for the Evaluation of Individual Quality of Life. It is generally agreed that a single tool will not cover all QOL assessment needs.
Item Type:
Article
Language:
en
Description:
In the past 5 years, quality-of-life (QOL) assessment measures such as the McGill, McMaster, Global Visual Analogue Scale, Assessment of QOL at the End of Life, Life Evaluation Questionnaire, and Hospice QOL Index have been devised specifically for patients with advanced cancer. The developers of these instruments have tried to respond to the changing needs of this specific population, taking into account characteristics including poor performance status, difficulty with longitudinal study, rapidly deteriorating physical condition, and change in relevant issues. Emphasis has been placed on patient report, ease and speed of completion, and the existential domain or meaning of life. Novel techniques in QOL measurement have also been adapted for palliative care, such as judgment analysis in the Schedule for the Evaluation of Individual Quality of Life. It is generally agreed that a single tool will not cover all QOL assessment needs.
Keywords:
HEALTH STATUS; CANCER
MeSH:
Health Status Indicators; Humans; Neoplasms; Pain Measurement; Palliative Care; Psychometrics; Quality of Life; Questionnaires
ISSN:
1523-3790

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorDonnelly, Sen_GB
dc.date.accessioned2013-03-11T12:47:40Z-
dc.date.available2013-03-11T12:47:40Z-
dc.date.issued2000-07-
dc.identifier.citationQuality-of-life assessment in advanced cancer. 2000, 2 (4):338-42 Curr Oncol Repen_GB
dc.identifier.issn1523-3790-
dc.identifier.pmid11122862-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/271661-
dc.descriptionIn the past 5 years, quality-of-life (QOL) assessment measures such as the McGill, McMaster, Global Visual Analogue Scale, Assessment of QOL at the End of Life, Life Evaluation Questionnaire, and Hospice QOL Index have been devised specifically for patients with advanced cancer. The developers of these instruments have tried to respond to the changing needs of this specific population, taking into account characteristics including poor performance status, difficulty with longitudinal study, rapidly deteriorating physical condition, and change in relevant issues. Emphasis has been placed on patient report, ease and speed of completion, and the existential domain or meaning of life. Novel techniques in QOL measurement have also been adapted for palliative care, such as judgment analysis in the Schedule for the Evaluation of Individual Quality of Life. It is generally agreed that a single tool will not cover all QOL assessment needs.en_GB
dc.description.abstractIn the past 5 years, quality-of-life (QOL) assessment measures such as the McGill, McMaster, Global Visual Analogue Scale, Assessment of QOL at the End of Life, Life Evaluation Questionnaire, and Hospice QOL Index have been devised specifically for patients with advanced cancer. The developers of these instruments have tried to respond to the changing needs of this specific population, taking into account characteristics including poor performance status, difficulty with longitudinal study, rapidly deteriorating physical condition, and change in relevant issues. Emphasis has been placed on patient report, ease and speed of completion, and the existential domain or meaning of life. Novel techniques in QOL measurement have also been adapted for palliative care, such as judgment analysis in the Schedule for the Evaluation of Individual Quality of Life. It is generally agreed that a single tool will not cover all QOL assessment needs.-
dc.language.isoenen
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Current oncology reportsen_GB
dc.subjectHEALTH STATUSen_GB
dc.subjectCANCERen_GB
dc.subject.meshHealth Status Indicators-
dc.subject.meshHumans-
dc.subject.meshNeoplasms-
dc.subject.meshPain Measurement-
dc.subject.meshPalliative Care-
dc.subject.meshPsychometrics-
dc.subject.meshQuality of Life-
dc.subject.meshQuestionnaires-
dc.titleQuality-of-life assessment in advanced cancer.en_GB
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentMilford Care Centre, Plassey Park Road, Castletroy, Limerick, Ireland. milford@milfordcare.ieen_GB
dc.identifier.journalCurrent oncology reportsen_GB

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