Changes in human dendritic cell number and function in severe obesity may contribute to increased susceptibility to viral infection.

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/270973
Title:
Changes in human dendritic cell number and function in severe obesity may contribute to increased susceptibility to viral infection.
Authors:
O'Shea, D; Corrigan, M; Dunne, M R; Jackson, R; Woods, C; Gaoatswe, G; Moynagh, P N; O'Connell, J; Hogan, A E
Affiliation:
1] Obesity Immunology Group, Education and Research Centre, St Vincent's University Hospital, University College Dublin, Dublin, Ireland [2] Department of Endocrinology, St Columcille's Hospital, Health Service Executive, Loughlinstown, Dublin, Ireland.
Citation:
Changes in human dendritic cell number and function in severe obesity may contribute to increased susceptibility to viral infection. 2013: Int J Obes (Lond)
Journal:
International journal of obesity (2005)
Issue Date:
26-Feb-2013
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/270973
DOI:
10.1038/ijo.2013.16
PubMed ID:
23439322
Abstract:
Dendritic cells (DCs) are key immune sentinels linking the innate and adaptive immune systems. DCs recognise danger signals and initiate T-cell tolerance, memory and polarisation. They are critical cells in responding to a viral illness. Obese individuals have been shown to have an impaired response to vaccinations against virally mediated conditions and to have an increased susceptibility to multi-organ failure in response to viral illness. We investigated if DCs are altered in an obese cohort (mean body mass index 51.7±7.3 kg m(-2)), ultimately resulting in differential T-cell responses. Circulating DCs were found to be significantly decreased in the obese compared with the lean cohort (0.82% vs 2.53%). Following Toll-like receptor stimulation, compared with lean controls, DCs generated from the obese cohort upregulated significantly less CD83 (40% vs 17% mean fluorescence intensity), a molecule implicated in the elicitation of T-cell responses, particularly viral responses. Obese DCs produced twofold more of the immunosuppressive cytokine interleukin (IL)-10 than lean controls, and in turn stimulated fourfold more IL-4-production from allogenic naive T cells. We conclude that obesity negatively impacts the ability of DCs to mature and elicit appropriate T-cell responses to a general stimulus. This may contribute to the increased susceptibility to viral infection observed in severe obesity.International Journal of Obesity advance online publication, 26 February 2013; doi:10.1038/ijo.2013.16.
Item Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
1476-5497

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorO'Shea, Den_GB
dc.contributor.authorCorrigan, Men_GB
dc.contributor.authorDunne, M Ren_GB
dc.contributor.authorJackson, Ren_GB
dc.contributor.authorWoods, Cen_GB
dc.contributor.authorGaoatswe, Gen_GB
dc.contributor.authorMoynagh, P Nen_GB
dc.contributor.authorO'Connell, Jen_GB
dc.contributor.authorHogan, A Een_GB
dc.date.accessioned2013-03-04T16:31:32Z-
dc.date.available2013-03-04T16:31:32Z-
dc.date.issued2013-02-26-
dc.identifier.citationChanges in human dendritic cell number and function in severe obesity may contribute to increased susceptibility to viral infection. 2013: Int J Obes (Lond)en_GB
dc.identifier.issn1476-5497-
dc.identifier.pmid23439322-
dc.identifier.doi10.1038/ijo.2013.16-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/270973-
dc.description.abstractDendritic cells (DCs) are key immune sentinels linking the innate and adaptive immune systems. DCs recognise danger signals and initiate T-cell tolerance, memory and polarisation. They are critical cells in responding to a viral illness. Obese individuals have been shown to have an impaired response to vaccinations against virally mediated conditions and to have an increased susceptibility to multi-organ failure in response to viral illness. We investigated if DCs are altered in an obese cohort (mean body mass index 51.7±7.3 kg m(-2)), ultimately resulting in differential T-cell responses. Circulating DCs were found to be significantly decreased in the obese compared with the lean cohort (0.82% vs 2.53%). Following Toll-like receptor stimulation, compared with lean controls, DCs generated from the obese cohort upregulated significantly less CD83 (40% vs 17% mean fluorescence intensity), a molecule implicated in the elicitation of T-cell responses, particularly viral responses. Obese DCs produced twofold more of the immunosuppressive cytokine interleukin (IL)-10 than lean controls, and in turn stimulated fourfold more IL-4-production from allogenic naive T cells. We conclude that obesity negatively impacts the ability of DCs to mature and elicit appropriate T-cell responses to a general stimulus. This may contribute to the increased susceptibility to viral infection observed in severe obesity.International Journal of Obesity advance online publication, 26 February 2013; doi:10.1038/ijo.2013.16.en_GB
dc.languageENG-
dc.language.isoenen
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to International journal of obesity (2005)en_GB
dc.titleChanges in human dendritic cell number and function in severe obesity may contribute to increased susceptibility to viral infection.en_GB
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.department1] Obesity Immunology Group, Education and Research Centre, St Vincent's University Hospital, University College Dublin, Dublin, Ireland [2] Department of Endocrinology, St Columcille's Hospital, Health Service Executive, Loughlinstown, Dublin, Ireland.en_GB
dc.identifier.journalInternational journal of obesity (2005)en_GB
dc.description.provinceLeinsteren

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