READS: the rapid electronic assessment documentation system.

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/270353
Title:
READS: the rapid electronic assessment documentation system.
Authors:
Hickey, Ann; Gleeson, Margaret; Kellett, John
Affiliation:
Nenagh Hospital, Nenagh, Ireland.
Citation:
READS: the rapid electronic assessment documentation system., 21 (22):1333-6, 1338-40 Br J Nurs
Journal:
British journal of nursing (Mark Allen Publishing)
Issue Date:
13-Dec-2012
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/270353
PubMed ID:
23249801
Abstract:
Patient documentation is time consuming and can detract from care. The authors report a novel computer programme that manipulates routinely collected information to quantify nursing workload, along with the reason for admission, functional status, estimates of in-hospital mortality and life expectancy. The programme stores information in a database, and produces a print-out in a situation/background/assessment/recommendation (SBAR) format. The average time taken to enter 629 patient encounters was 6.6 minutes. Pain was the most common presentation for low workload patients, while high workload patients often presented with altered mental status and reduced mobility. There was only a modest correlation between the risk of death and nursing workload. The programme measures nursing workload without further paperwork, and improves routine documentation with a legible brief report that is automatically generated. This report can be shared and provides data that is immediately available for day-to-day care, audit, quality control and service planning.
Item Type:
Article
Language:
en
MeSH:
Documentation; Electronic Health Records; Hospitals, General; Hospitals, Rural; Humans; Ireland; Nursing Records; Nursing Staff, Hospital; Workload
ISSN:
0966-0461

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorHickey, Annen_GB
dc.contributor.authorGleeson, Margareten_GB
dc.contributor.authorKellett, Johnen_GB
dc.date.accessioned2013-02-25T14:17:26Z-
dc.date.available2013-02-25T14:17:26Z-
dc.date.issued2012-12-13-
dc.identifier.citationREADS: the rapid electronic assessment documentation system., 21 (22):1333-6, 1338-40 Br J Nursen_GB
dc.identifier.issn0966-0461-
dc.identifier.pmid23249801-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/270353-
dc.description.abstractPatient documentation is time consuming and can detract from care. The authors report a novel computer programme that manipulates routinely collected information to quantify nursing workload, along with the reason for admission, functional status, estimates of in-hospital mortality and life expectancy. The programme stores information in a database, and produces a print-out in a situation/background/assessment/recommendation (SBAR) format. The average time taken to enter 629 patient encounters was 6.6 minutes. Pain was the most common presentation for low workload patients, while high workload patients often presented with altered mental status and reduced mobility. There was only a modest correlation between the risk of death and nursing workload. The programme measures nursing workload without further paperwork, and improves routine documentation with a legible brief report that is automatically generated. This report can be shared and provides data that is immediately available for day-to-day care, audit, quality control and service planning.en_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to British journal of nursing (Mark Allen Publishing)en_GB
dc.subject.meshDocumentation-
dc.subject.meshElectronic Health Records-
dc.subject.meshHospitals, General-
dc.subject.meshHospitals, Rural-
dc.subject.meshHumans-
dc.subject.meshIreland-
dc.subject.meshNursing Records-
dc.subject.meshNursing Staff, Hospital-
dc.subject.meshWorkload-
dc.titleREADS: the rapid electronic assessment documentation system.en_GB
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentNenagh Hospital, Nenagh, Ireland.en_GB
dc.identifier.journalBritish journal of nursing (Mark Allen Publishing)en_GB
dc.description.provinceMunsteren

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