Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/267297
Title:
The introduction of service contracts: reaction and response
Authors:
Food Safety Authority of Ireland (FSAI)
Publisher:
Food Safety Authority of Ireland (FSAI)
Issue Date:
Apr-2000
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/267297
Item Type:
Report
Language:
en
Description:
A chronology of food scares and threats to public health has damaged consumer confidence in the safety of the food supply, in industry's commitment to producing safe food and in the regulatory agencies' ability to ensure food businesses comply with the law. Across the EU each Member State is reviewing how it implements its food safety control programmes. A series of independent food safety agencies have been created and more are on.the way with a pan-European agency scheduled for 2002. Ireland was the first Member State to create a new agency, the Food Safety Authority of Ireland (FSAI). Accountable to the Minister for Health and Children, the FSAI is a science based consumer protection agency. A key objective of the FSAI is to develop a culture of food safety in Ireland so that Irish consumers and purchasers of Irish food abroad can have the utmost confidence in our standards and controls. In Ireland, the food safety inspection system was fragmented with responsibilities dispersed over 48 agencies each working independently of other agencies on a segment of the food chain. Under the Food Safety Authority of Ireland Act, 1998 responsibilities for enforcement of food safety standards rests with the FSAI. This responsibility is discharged via service contracts with all the official agencies involved. It is hoped that by co-ordinating all food safety control activity through service contracts that a seamless inspection service can be developed with no gaps in the continuum from farm to fork. Over 1,900 people are involved, whole time and part time, in food safety activities and the range of skills and abilities is formidable. Effectively, harnessing the innate enthusiasm and abilities of these staff will ultimately determine whether this "seamless inspection service" becomes a reality. The achievements possible by the agencies working together as agents of the FSAI will far exceed the sum of the individual contributions. Together we can and will achieve change and raise standards in all sectors of the food industry.
Keywords:
FOOD SAFETY; CONSUMER INFORMATION

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorFood Safety Authority of Ireland (FSAI)en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2013-01-28T11:31:19Z-
dc.date.available2013-01-28T11:31:19Z-
dc.date.issued2000-04-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/267297-
dc.descriptionA chronology of food scares and threats to public health has damaged consumer confidence in the safety of the food supply, in industry's commitment to producing safe food and in the regulatory agencies' ability to ensure food businesses comply with the law. Across the EU each Member State is reviewing how it implements its food safety control programmes. A series of independent food safety agencies have been created and more are on.the way with a pan-European agency scheduled for 2002. Ireland was the first Member State to create a new agency, the Food Safety Authority of Ireland (FSAI). Accountable to the Minister for Health and Children, the FSAI is a science based consumer protection agency. A key objective of the FSAI is to develop a culture of food safety in Ireland so that Irish consumers and purchasers of Irish food abroad can have the utmost confidence in our standards and controls. In Ireland, the food safety inspection system was fragmented with responsibilities dispersed over 48 agencies each working independently of other agencies on a segment of the food chain. Under the Food Safety Authority of Ireland Act, 1998 responsibilities for enforcement of food safety standards rests with the FSAI. This responsibility is discharged via service contracts with all the official agencies involved. It is hoped that by co-ordinating all food safety control activity through service contracts that a seamless inspection service can be developed with no gaps in the continuum from farm to fork. Over 1,900 people are involved, whole time and part time, in food safety activities and the range of skills and abilities is formidable. Effectively, harnessing the innate enthusiasm and abilities of these staff will ultimately determine whether this "seamless inspection service" becomes a reality. The achievements possible by the agencies working together as agents of the FSAI will far exceed the sum of the individual contributions. Together we can and will achieve change and raise standards in all sectors of the food industry.en_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherFood Safety Authority of Ireland (FSAI)en_GB
dc.subjectFOOD SAFETYen_GB
dc.subjectCONSUMER INFORMATIONen_GB
dc.titleThe introduction of service contracts: reaction and responseen_GB
dc.typeReporten
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