Violence and aggression in A&E Departments of six major Dublin hospitals: report of a working group.

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/267212
Title:
Violence and aggression in A&E Departments of six major Dublin hospitals: report of a working group.
Authors:
Accident and Emergency Steering Group; Bruton, John
Affiliation:
Eastern Health Board (EHB)
Publisher:
Eastern Health Board (EHB)
Issue Date:
2000
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/267212
Language:
en
Description:
The literature confirms that the level of violence and aggression in hospital A&E Departments has only recently been documented as a significant problem throughout the U.S.A., the U.K. and in Ireland. The purpose of this study is to define the nature and extent of this problem in the six major Hospitals in the Dublin region and to make recommendations. As part of its deliberations the Group decided to approach it's task by (a) using the knowledge, experiences and expertise of its members in A&E departments, to determine the nature of the problem and (b) conducted a study of incidents actually recorded by the six Hospitals, to identify the extent of the problem. The Group is satisfied that violence arid aggression presents as a major problem in all six Hospitals, is unanimous in its recommendations and identifies the need for action at three levels. Firstly, procedures for the reporting and recording of incidents need to be established in each Hospital. This requirement. is fundamental and crucial to the effective management of violence and aggression. Secondly, each Hospital needs to develop and implement a preventative strategy designed to address the problem. The group makes several recommendations for the focus of the strategy. Thirdly, there are external factors outside the control of individual hospitals which contribute to the problem and will need to be addressed in the context of the wider health and social care services.
Keywords:
HOSPITAL; VIOLENCE; EMERGENCY MEDICAL CARE

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorAccident and Emergency Steering Groupen_GB
dc.contributor.authorBruton, Johnen_GB
dc.date.accessioned2013-01-27T00:05:50Z-
dc.date.available2013-01-27T00:05:50Z-
dc.date.issued2000-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/267212-
dc.descriptionThe literature confirms that the level of violence and aggression in hospital A&E Departments has only recently been documented as a significant problem throughout the U.S.A., the U.K. and in Ireland. The purpose of this study is to define the nature and extent of this problem in the six major Hospitals in the Dublin region and to make recommendations. As part of its deliberations the Group decided to approach it's task by (a) using the knowledge, experiences and expertise of its members in A&E departments, to determine the nature of the problem and (b) conducted a study of incidents actually recorded by the six Hospitals, to identify the extent of the problem. The Group is satisfied that violence arid aggression presents as a major problem in all six Hospitals, is unanimous in its recommendations and identifies the need for action at three levels. Firstly, procedures for the reporting and recording of incidents need to be established in each Hospital. This requirement. is fundamental and crucial to the effective management of violence and aggression. Secondly, each Hospital needs to develop and implement a preventative strategy designed to address the problem. The group makes several recommendations for the focus of the strategy. Thirdly, there are external factors outside the control of individual hospitals which contribute to the problem and will need to be addressed in the context of the wider health and social care services.en_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherEastern Health Board (EHB)en_GB
dc.subjectHOSPITALen_GB
dc.subjectVIOLENCEen_GB
dc.subjectEMERGENCY MEDICAL CAREen_GB
dc.titleViolence and aggression in A&E Departments of six major Dublin hospitals: report of a working group.en_GB
dc.contributor.departmentEastern Health Board (EHB)en_GB
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