The Rotunda Stop Smoking Programme: smoking and pregnancy: feasability and effectiveness of a smoking intervention programme among pregnant women.

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/267172
Title:
The Rotunda Stop Smoking Programme: smoking and pregnancy: feasability and effectiveness of a smoking intervention programme among pregnant women.
Authors:
Thornton, Lelia
Affiliation:
Department of Public Health. Eastern Health Board
Issue Date:
29-May-1997
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/267172
Abstract:
Cigarette smoking has been declining in both sexes but at a slower rate in women. In Ireland the prevalence in men is now 29% compared with 28% in women so the gap between the sexes is almost non-existent. Ireland is among the E.U. countries with the lowest percentage of smokers in males, but the percentage of females smoking is higher in Ireland than in more than half the other E.U. countries. Smoking is an avoidable risk factor in pregnancy. It has been well established that maternal smoking in pregnancy has significant adverse effects on fetal growth and the outcome of pregnancy. The adverse effects include an increased risk of low birthweight, perinatal mortality, spontaneous abortion, placenta praevia, abruptio placentae, bleeding during pregnancy, premature rupture of membranes and premature delivery. The effects of smoking in pregnancy extend well beyond infancy with a reduction in growth and educational achievement. Recent studies have confirmed the increased risk of sudden infant death syndrome associated with maternal smoking during pregnancy. For most of these effects a dose-response relationship has been demonstrated.
Item Type:
Report
Language:
en
Keywords:
SMOKING CESSATION; PREGNANT WOMAN

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorThornton, Leliaen_GB
dc.date.accessioned2013-01-26T21:28:08Z-
dc.date.available2013-01-26T21:28:08Z-
dc.date.issued1997-05-29-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/267172-
dc.description.abstractCigarette smoking has been declining in both sexes but at a slower rate in women. In Ireland the prevalence in men is now 29% compared with 28% in women so the gap between the sexes is almost non-existent. Ireland is among the E.U. countries with the lowest percentage of smokers in males, but the percentage of females smoking is higher in Ireland than in more than half the other E.U. countries. Smoking is an avoidable risk factor in pregnancy. It has been well established that maternal smoking in pregnancy has significant adverse effects on fetal growth and the outcome of pregnancy. The adverse effects include an increased risk of low birthweight, perinatal mortality, spontaneous abortion, placenta praevia, abruptio placentae, bleeding during pregnancy, premature rupture of membranes and premature delivery. The effects of smoking in pregnancy extend well beyond infancy with a reduction in growth and educational achievement. Recent studies have confirmed the increased risk of sudden infant death syndrome associated with maternal smoking during pregnancy. For most of these effects a dose-response relationship has been demonstrated.en_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subjectSMOKING CESSATIONen_GB
dc.subjectPREGNANT WOMANen_GB
dc.titleThe Rotunda Stop Smoking Programme: smoking and pregnancy: feasability and effectiveness of a smoking intervention programme among pregnant women.en_GB
dc.typeReporten
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Public Health. Eastern Health Boarden_GB
dc.description.provinceLeinsteren
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