Iron Project: submission to the Department of Health and Children.

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/266975
Title:
Iron Project: submission to the Department of Health and Children.
Authors:
Department of Health (DoH); North Western Health Board in association with Sligo Insitute of Technology, Trinity College Dublin and NUI Galway
Publisher:
Department of Health (DoH)
Issue Date:
2000
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/266975
Item Type:
Report
Language:
en
Description:
Routine sampling over the last ten years in the North Western Health Board region has shown areas with extremely high levels of Iron and Manganese in the drinking water. Of the population of the region, over 160,000 people are served by public· water supplies and the remaining 50,000 by private wells and group water schemes. These sources regularly exceed the Maximum Allowable Concentrations (MAC's) of both elements often to a very large extent. This problem is not confined to the North West and other counties exceeding MAC values include Meath, Cavan, Roscommon, Monaghan, Mayo, Kerry and Offaly. • At present there are no international guidelines relating to the maximum levels of these substances above which health, may be affected. • It is not clear whether a sustained high iron intake from drinking water may affect the health status of the general population and particularly those with hereditary haemochromatosis.
Keywords:
IRON; WATER QUALITY

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorDepartment of Health (DoH)en_GB
dc.contributor.authorNorth Western Health Board in association with Sligo Insitute of Technology, Trinity College Dublin and NUI Galwayen_GB
dc.date.accessioned2013-01-25T14:11:32Z-
dc.date.available2013-01-25T14:11:32Z-
dc.date.issued2000-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/266975-
dc.descriptionRoutine sampling over the last ten years in the North Western Health Board region has shown areas with extremely high levels of Iron and Manganese in the drinking water. Of the population of the region, over 160,000 people are served by public· water supplies and the remaining 50,000 by private wells and group water schemes. These sources regularly exceed the Maximum Allowable Concentrations (MAC's) of both elements often to a very large extent. This problem is not confined to the North West and other counties exceeding MAC values include Meath, Cavan, Roscommon, Monaghan, Mayo, Kerry and Offaly. • At present there are no international guidelines relating to the maximum levels of these substances above which health, may be affected. • It is not clear whether a sustained high iron intake from drinking water may affect the health status of the general population and particularly those with hereditary haemochromatosis.en_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherDepartment of Health (DoH)en_GB
dc.subjectIRONen_GB
dc.subjectWATER QUALITYen_GB
dc.titleIron Project: submission to the Department of Health and Children.en_GB
dc.typeReporten
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