Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/266554
Title:
Scoping study of national survey of sexual attitudes and behaviours.
Authors:
Layte, Richard; Fullerton, Deirdre; McGee, Hannah
Affiliation:
Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland
Publisher:
Economic and Social Research Institute (ESRI)
Issue Date:
29-May-2003
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/266554
Item Type:
Study
Language:
en
Description:
Although there were surveys of sexual behaviour before the 1980s such as the Kinsey Report of 1948 (and the subsequent Little Kinsey report in Britain by Mass Observation in 1949), it was only in the late 1980s after the full implications of the AIDS epidemic had become clear that surveys of sexual knowledge, attitudes and behaviour (KAB) became more common (Stanley 1995). In trying to understand the spread of HIV and form some strategic response, it became obvious in most countries that more information was needed about the sexual practices of the population such as the prevalence of risky behaviours and number of sexual partners. As a result, the last two decades have seen over 40 national surveys of sexual behaviour carried in western countries, the largest of which is the National Survey of Sexual Attitudes and Lifestyles (NATSAL) survey in Britain. The NATSAL survey was first completed in 1990 (NATSALl) and repeated a decade later in 2000 (NATSAL2). The information from national surveys has been invaluable both for increasing our understanding of patterns of sexual behaviour and helping policy makers design interventions in the area of sexual health. For example, in Britain, results from the two NATSAL surveys (Wellings et al 1994, Johnson et al 2001) explained why the incidence of STIs had been increasing in Britain in the previous decade by showing an increase in a wide range of behaviours associated with a heightened risk of HIV and STI transmission, including the numbers of partners, concurrent partnership, heterosexual anal sex and payment for sex. Moreover it also explained the higher rates of infection in those younger than age 25 as reported in national surveillance statistics by showing that rates of new partner acquisition among this age group and among those not cohabiting or married were higher.
Keywords:
SEXUAL BEHAVIOUR; STATISTICAL DATA

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorLayte, Richarden_GB
dc.contributor.authorFullerton, Deirdreen_GB
dc.contributor.authorMcGee, Hannahen_GB
dc.date.accessioned2013-01-22T16:27:19Z-
dc.date.available2013-01-22T16:27:19Z-
dc.date.issued2003-05-29-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/266554-
dc.descriptionAlthough there were surveys of sexual behaviour before the 1980s such as the Kinsey Report of 1948 (and the subsequent Little Kinsey report in Britain by Mass Observation in 1949), it was only in the late 1980s after the full implications of the AIDS epidemic had become clear that surveys of sexual knowledge, attitudes and behaviour (KAB) became more common (Stanley 1995). In trying to understand the spread of HIV and form some strategic response, it became obvious in most countries that more information was needed about the sexual practices of the population such as the prevalence of risky behaviours and number of sexual partners. As a result, the last two decades have seen over 40 national surveys of sexual behaviour carried in western countries, the largest of which is the National Survey of Sexual Attitudes and Lifestyles (NATSAL) survey in Britain. The NATSAL survey was first completed in 1990 (NATSALl) and repeated a decade later in 2000 (NATSAL2). The information from national surveys has been invaluable both for increasing our understanding of patterns of sexual behaviour and helping policy makers design interventions in the area of sexual health. For example, in Britain, results from the two NATSAL surveys (Wellings et al 1994, Johnson et al 2001) explained why the incidence of STIs had been increasing in Britain in the previous decade by showing an increase in a wide range of behaviours associated with a heightened risk of HIV and STI transmission, including the numbers of partners, concurrent partnership, heterosexual anal sex and payment for sex. Moreover it also explained the higher rates of infection in those younger than age 25 as reported in national surveillance statistics by showing that rates of new partner acquisition among this age group and among those not cohabiting or married were higher.en_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherEconomic and Social Research Institute (ESRI)en_GB
dc.subjectSEXUAL BEHAVIOURen_GB
dc.subjectSTATISTICAL DATAen_GB
dc.titleScoping study of national survey of sexual attitudes and behaviours.en_GB
dc.typeStudyen
dc.contributor.departmentRoyal College of Surgeons in Irelanden_GB
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