Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/266534
Title:
Medical manslaughter
Authors:
Lyons, B
Publisher:
Irish Medical Journal
Journal:
Irish Medical Journal
Issue Date:
Jan-2013
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/266534
Abstract:
On November 29, 2011 Dr Conrad Murray was sentenced to four years in prison after being convicted of the involuntary manslaughter of Michael Jackson. Expert witness statements indicated that Murray' s actions were an extreme departure from the standard of care , particularly with regard to (1) inappropriately treating insomnia with a surgical anaesthetic (propofol); (2) failing to acquire sufficiently informed consent; (3) administering propofol without the necessary monitoring equipment; (4) delaying contacting the emergency services; and (5) making ineffective resuscitation efforts. Further medical evidence argued that Murray' s care of Jackson contained "17 egregious violations", defined as acts that posed a foreseeable danger to the patient’s life. These deficiencies, it was stated, constituted gross negligence.
Item Type:
Article
Language:
en
Keywords:
MEDICAL ETHICS
Local subject classification:
NEGLIGENCE

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorLyons, Ben_GB
dc.date.accessioned2013-01-22T16:26:11Z-
dc.date.available2013-01-22T16:26:11Z-
dc.date.issued2013-01-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/266534-
dc.description.abstractOn November 29, 2011 Dr Conrad Murray was sentenced to four years in prison after being convicted of the involuntary manslaughter of Michael Jackson. Expert witness statements indicated that Murray' s actions were an extreme departure from the standard of care , particularly with regard to (1) inappropriately treating insomnia with a surgical anaesthetic (propofol); (2) failing to acquire sufficiently informed consent; (3) administering propofol without the necessary monitoring equipment; (4) delaying contacting the emergency services; and (5) making ineffective resuscitation efforts. Further medical evidence argued that Murray' s care of Jackson contained "17 egregious violations", defined as acts that posed a foreseeable danger to the patient’s life. These deficiencies, it was stated, constituted gross negligence.en_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherIrish Medical Journalen_GB
dc.subjectMEDICAL ETHICSen_GB
dc.subject.otherNEGLIGENCEen_GB
dc.titleMedical manslaughteren_GB
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalIrish Medical Journalen_GB
dc.description.provinceLeinsteren
All Items in Lenus, The Irish Health Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.