Report of the Task Force on Violence against Women April 1997

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/266299
Title:
Report of the Task Force on Violence against Women April 1997
Authors:
Office of the Tanaiste
Publisher:
Stationery Office
Issue Date:
Apr-1997
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/266299
Item Type:
Report
Language:
en
Description:
Women are entitled to live in safety. Above all, they are entitled to live in safety in their own homes. Violence against women, however, is a serious and widespread problem in our society. It is over twenty years since the first women's refuge was set up in Ireland, and the first Rape Crisis Centre founded. Today there is a network of refuges and Rape Crisis Centres around the country. Major changes have been made in the laws on rape, and the 1996 Domestic Violence Act was a legal milestone. Services, however, have developed in a piecemeal and relatively haphazard way rather than as a co-ordinated strategy. There are gaps in services which must be filled. The separate services offered to women who want to escape a violent relationship by different public and voluntary bodies need to be welded into a coherent set of supports. The Task Force's aim is to ensure women experiencing violence can have real options, that when they disclose what, is happening they are listened to and believed, that public services are in a position to offer practical help and an assurance of safety. Women and children who have lived with violence need counselling and support to find the inner strength to rebuild their lives. In order to empower women who have lived with violence to break their silence, we want to ensure accurate advice. and information is readily available, so women know the options open to them, and can make informed choices. There must be effective responses from the criminal justice system - responses which reinforce the message that an attack on a woman by her partner is as serious a crime as an attack by a stranger. The Task Force ,has set out a process where service needs, service provision and service standards can be regularly reviewed and addressed. It identifies a chain of responsibility for making things happen. Public services in the community must have agreed practices and written procedures on violence against women, offering women a safe and accepting environment in which to disclose abuse, and a gateway to specialist advice, information and practical help. Working with women and children only addresses one side of the problem. Programmes for violent men that confront violent behaviour must be developed and expanded. A society where women are not regarded as equals, or which sees violence as a legitimate way of resolving conflict, is one where violence to women can flourish. Work with young people has an important role to play in preventing violence and abuse in a new generation. This Report sends a powerful signal from the Government. It says loud and clear that our society unambiguously condemns and abhors violence against women; that victims of violence must be treated with dignity and respect; that an adequate network of services must be in place to meet their needs; and that those who perpetrate such violence can draw no comfort or tolerance from our society.
Keywords:
VIOLENCE; WOMAN; PARTNER ABUSE
Series/Report no.:
P; 48401
ISBN:
0707638659

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorOffice of the Tanaisteen_GB
dc.date.accessioned2013-01-21T11:35:32Z-
dc.date.available2013-01-21T11:35:32Z-
dc.date.issued1997-04-
dc.identifier.isbn0707638659-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/266299-
dc.descriptionWomen are entitled to live in safety. Above all, they are entitled to live in safety in their own homes. Violence against women, however, is a serious and widespread problem in our society. It is over twenty years since the first women's refuge was set up in Ireland, and the first Rape Crisis Centre founded. Today there is a network of refuges and Rape Crisis Centres around the country. Major changes have been made in the laws on rape, and the 1996 Domestic Violence Act was a legal milestone. Services, however, have developed in a piecemeal and relatively haphazard way rather than as a co-ordinated strategy. There are gaps in services which must be filled. The separate services offered to women who want to escape a violent relationship by different public and voluntary bodies need to be welded into a coherent set of supports. The Task Force's aim is to ensure women experiencing violence can have real options, that when they disclose what, is happening they are listened to and believed, that public services are in a position to offer practical help and an assurance of safety. Women and children who have lived with violence need counselling and support to find the inner strength to rebuild their lives. In order to empower women who have lived with violence to break their silence, we want to ensure accurate advice. and information is readily available, so women know the options open to them, and can make informed choices. There must be effective responses from the criminal justice system - responses which reinforce the message that an attack on a woman by her partner is as serious a crime as an attack by a stranger. The Task Force ,has set out a process where service needs, service provision and service standards can be regularly reviewed and addressed. It identifies a chain of responsibility for making things happen. Public services in the community must have agreed practices and written procedures on violence against women, offering women a safe and accepting environment in which to disclose abuse, and a gateway to specialist advice, information and practical help. Working with women and children only addresses one side of the problem. Programmes for violent men that confront violent behaviour must be developed and expanded. A society where women are not regarded as equals, or which sees violence as a legitimate way of resolving conflict, is one where violence to women can flourish. Work with young people has an important role to play in preventing violence and abuse in a new generation. This Report sends a powerful signal from the Government. It says loud and clear that our society unambiguously condemns and abhors violence against women; that victims of violence must be treated with dignity and respect; that an adequate network of services must be in place to meet their needs; and that those who perpetrate such violence can draw no comfort or tolerance from our society.en_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherStationery Officeen_GB
dc.relation.ispartofseriesPen_GB
dc.relation.ispartofseries48401en_GB
dc.subjectVIOLENCEen_GB
dc.subjectWOMANen_GB
dc.subjectPARTNER ABUSEen_GB
dc.titleReport of the Task Force on Violence against Women April 1997en_GB
dc.typeReporten
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