Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/266192
Title:
Report on childhood immunisation
Authors:
Laffoy, Marie
Publisher:
Eastern Regional Health Authority (ERHA)
Issue Date:
20-Jan-2013
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/266192
Item Type:
Report
Language:
en
Description:
In 2000, there was a measles outbreak in the Eastern Region, which led to 1,253 cases, three deaths and just over 350 hospital admissions. In 2001, there was a decline in the uptake rates at 12 and 24 months for all primary immunisations. This decrease was most marked for the Measles, Mumps and Rubella Vaccine (MMR) uptake rates at 24 months where a drop of 21 % was noted. This reflected a national trend and was also influenced by negative media coverage of MMR vaccine. A Regional Immunisation Committee was convened in February 2002, which resulted in this report. The issues considered by the Regional Committee were: 1. Planning and organisation of immunisation programmes including structures, processes, staffing and the. immunisation contract between Area Health Boards and General Practitioners 2. Information systems for immunisation surveillance 3. Materials management 4. Communication strategies The deficits identified in the four areas outlined above were as follows: Planning and Organisation 1. A standard practice does not exist in the Region for provision of lists to general practitioners.(GP) of cohorts of children requiring primary immunisation. This limits calculation of an important performance indicator within practice populations i.e. uptake rates of primary childhood immunisations and estimation of targets for bonus payments. 2. Problems exist in relation to the timeliness of receipt of immunisation returns by Area Health Boards (AHBs) from GPs and also in the timeliness of payment of GPs for primary childhood immunisations. 3. There is no regional policy for identifying and following up defaulters. 4. Use of parent·held records is not standard practice across the Region. 5. Difficulties in recruiting and retaining staff to run school immunisation programmes have impacted negatively on the uptake of booster vaccination in the 4 to 6 year age group in some Community Services Areas (CSAs).
Keywords:
IMMUNISATION; CHILD HEALTH
Series/Report no.:
Report; 02/03

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorLaffoy, Marieen_GB
dc.date.accessioned2013-01-20T15:10:18Z-
dc.date.available2013-01-20T15:10:18Z-
dc.date.issued2013-01-20-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/266192-
dc.descriptionIn 2000, there was a measles outbreak in the Eastern Region, which led to 1,253 cases, three deaths and just over 350 hospital admissions. In 2001, there was a decline in the uptake rates at 12 and 24 months for all primary immunisations. This decrease was most marked for the Measles, Mumps and Rubella Vaccine (MMR) uptake rates at 24 months where a drop of 21 % was noted. This reflected a national trend and was also influenced by negative media coverage of MMR vaccine. A Regional Immunisation Committee was convened in February 2002, which resulted in this report. The issues considered by the Regional Committee were: 1. Planning and organisation of immunisation programmes including structures, processes, staffing and the. immunisation contract between Area Health Boards and General Practitioners 2. Information systems for immunisation surveillance 3. Materials management 4. Communication strategies The deficits identified in the four areas outlined above were as follows: Planning and Organisation 1. A standard practice does not exist in the Region for provision of lists to general practitioners.(GP) of cohorts of children requiring primary immunisation. This limits calculation of an important performance indicator within practice populations i.e. uptake rates of primary childhood immunisations and estimation of targets for bonus payments. 2. Problems exist in relation to the timeliness of receipt of immunisation returns by Area Health Boards (AHBs) from GPs and also in the timeliness of payment of GPs for primary childhood immunisations. 3. There is no regional policy for identifying and following up defaulters. 4. Use of parent·held records is not standard practice across the Region. 5. Difficulties in recruiting and retaining staff to run school immunisation programmes have impacted negatively on the uptake of booster vaccination in the 4 to 6 year age group in some Community Services Areas (CSAs).en_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherEastern Regional Health Authority (ERHA)en_GB
dc.relation.ispartofseriesReporten_GB
dc.relation.ispartofseries02/03en_GB
dc.subjectIMMUNISATIONen_GB
dc.subjectCHILD HEALTHen_GB
dc.titleReport on childhood immunisationen_GB
dc.typeReporten
All Items in Lenus, The Irish Health Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.