Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/266132
Title:
Report of the Chief Health Inspector City of Dublin 1981
Authors:
Eastern Health Board (EHB)
Issue Date:
1981
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/266132
Item Type:
Report
Language:
en
Description:
This report represents the work of the Health Inspectorate in the City of Dublin for the year 1981. The work of the health inspector spans both the Eastern Health Board and Corporation of Dublin services. It has been considered more appropriate and more efficient, so far at any rate, to maintain the integrity of the Inspectorate, providing a service for the health authority and local authority rather than having two separate Inspectorates. While this has proved to be the most pragmatic organisation of services, it does put pressure on the Inspectorate in ordering priorities. It is not always easy to convince one section that another has a prior claim. However, there is no great difficulty in dealing with the volume of work once adequate staffing can be maintained. The Health Inspectorate has a work reporting relationship with the Health Board and three separate sections of Dublin Corporation i.e., HOUSING, PLANNING and COMMUNITY & ENVIRONMENT. The City is divided into 30 districts and the District Health Inspector provides a general control at this level. Because of the complexity of much of the work, specialist back-up services are also provided in areas such as food sampling, hygiene education,. sea and airport control, pest control, atmospheric pollution and noise control as well as plans evaluation. The maintenance of an adequate establishment of health inspectors in the City has been a problem for many years. The concentration of work and the nature of some of it cannot compare with the open spaces of rural Ireland. Yet from experience, Dublin is expected to be the shop window of the service as well as taking a large influx of students especially during the Winter in-service training period. However, working conditions in the City have improved during the year. The provision of car parking facilities'and commuter tickets have been appreciated. Nevertheless, judging from the number of applications received for transfers to rural areas of the Eastern Health Board, one has to conclude that Dublin City is still the poor relation of the adjoining countryside.
Keywords:
HEALTH EDUCATION; HYGIENE

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorEastern Health Board (EHB)en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2013-01-19T21:26:50Z-
dc.date.available2013-01-19T21:26:50Z-
dc.date.issued1981-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/266132-
dc.descriptionThis report represents the work of the Health Inspectorate in the City of Dublin for the year 1981. The work of the health inspector spans both the Eastern Health Board and Corporation of Dublin services. It has been considered more appropriate and more efficient, so far at any rate, to maintain the integrity of the Inspectorate, providing a service for the health authority and local authority rather than having two separate Inspectorates. While this has proved to be the most pragmatic organisation of services, it does put pressure on the Inspectorate in ordering priorities. It is not always easy to convince one section that another has a prior claim. However, there is no great difficulty in dealing with the volume of work once adequate staffing can be maintained. The Health Inspectorate has a work reporting relationship with the Health Board and three separate sections of Dublin Corporation i.e., HOUSING, PLANNING and COMMUNITY & ENVIRONMENT. The City is divided into 30 districts and the District Health Inspector provides a general control at this level. Because of the complexity of much of the work, specialist back-up services are also provided in areas such as food sampling, hygiene education,. sea and airport control, pest control, atmospheric pollution and noise control as well as plans evaluation. The maintenance of an adequate establishment of health inspectors in the City has been a problem for many years. The concentration of work and the nature of some of it cannot compare with the open spaces of rural Ireland. Yet from experience, Dublin is expected to be the shop window of the service as well as taking a large influx of students especially during the Winter in-service training period. However, working conditions in the City have improved during the year. The provision of car parking facilities'and commuter tickets have been appreciated. Nevertheless, judging from the number of applications received for transfers to rural areas of the Eastern Health Board, one has to conclude that Dublin City is still the poor relation of the adjoining countryside.en_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subjectHEALTH EDUCATIONen_GB
dc.subjectHYGIENEen_GB
dc.titleReport of the Chief Health Inspector City of Dublin 1981en_GB
dc.typeReporten
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