Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/266112
Title:
Rabies: prevention and control
Authors:
Cork Zoonoses Committee; Cork County Council; Cork Corporation; Southern Health Board (SHB)
Publisher:
Southern Health Board (SHB)
Issue Date:
1996
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/266112
Item Type:
Report
Language:
en
Description:
Rabies is a typical zoonosis in that it is primarily a disease of animals which occasionally spills over into the human population. It occurs world-wide, with an estimated 35,000 - 40,000 human deaths annually, almost all in developing countries. Ireland is a "Rabies free area". A rabies free area may be defined as "one in which an effective import policy is implemented and, in the presence of adequate disease surveillance, no case of indigenously acquired rabies infection has been confirmed in humans or any animal species at any time during the previous two years" [WHO 1992] In the event of rabies being introduced to a country free of the disease, such as Ireland, transmission of the disease among a stray dog population or urban foxes would be a matter of serious public health concern as members of the human population would also be at risk. Possible threats to human health: Foreign travel Animal smuggling Lifting of trade barriers Migrating bats (unlikely). Rabies in animals occurs in all continents except Australasia and Antartica. Countries currently free of rabies in the animal population include Australia, New Zealand, New Guinea, Japan, Hawaii, Taiwan, Oceania, UK*, Ireland, Iceland, mainland Norway, Sweden, Finland, Portugal, Greece and some of the West Indies and Atlantic Islands.
Keywords:
COMMUNICABLE DISEASE; PUBLIC HEALTH

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorCork Zoonoses Committeeen_GB
dc.contributor.authorCork County Councilen_GB
dc.contributor.authorCork Corporationen_GB
dc.contributor.authorSouthern Health Board (SHB)en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2013-01-19T14:16:14Z-
dc.date.available2013-01-19T14:16:14Z-
dc.date.issued1996-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/266112-
dc.descriptionRabies is a typical zoonosis in that it is primarily a disease of animals which occasionally spills over into the human population. It occurs world-wide, with an estimated 35,000 - 40,000 human deaths annually, almost all in developing countries. Ireland is a "Rabies free area". A rabies free area may be defined as "one in which an effective import policy is implemented and, in the presence of adequate disease surveillance, no case of indigenously acquired rabies infection has been confirmed in humans or any animal species at any time during the previous two years" [WHO 1992] In the event of rabies being introduced to a country free of the disease, such as Ireland, transmission of the disease among a stray dog population or urban foxes would be a matter of serious public health concern as members of the human population would also be at risk. Possible threats to human health: Foreign travel Animal smuggling Lifting of trade barriers Migrating bats (unlikely). Rabies in animals occurs in all continents except Australasia and Antartica. Countries currently free of rabies in the animal population include Australia, New Zealand, New Guinea, Japan, Hawaii, Taiwan, Oceania, UK*, Ireland, Iceland, mainland Norway, Sweden, Finland, Portugal, Greece and some of the West Indies and Atlantic Islands.en_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherSouthern Health Board (SHB)en_GB
dc.subjectCOMMUNICABLE DISEASEen_GB
dc.subjectPUBLIC HEALTHen_GB
dc.titleRabies: prevention and controlen_GB
dc.typeReporten
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