Prescribing practises and the development of General Practitioner Services.

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/266035
Title:
Prescribing practises and the development of General Practitioner Services.
Authors:
Department of Health (DoH)
Publisher:
Government of Ireland
Issue Date:
Sep-1997
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/266035
Item Type:
Report
Language:
en
Description:
Entitlement to State funded health care is divided into two categories. Category One provides entitlement to a means tested medical card under the General Medical Services (GMS) scheme with eligibility to a comprehensive range of health services free of charge, including general practitioner services and prescribed drugs and medicines. Category Two provides entitlement to public hospital services subject to statutory charges. At 31 December 1996, the GMS scheme provided for the health care needs of 1.25 million people, representing 34.6% of the population, at a total cost of £264.1 million. The cost of drugs and medicines prescribed under the GMS scheme has increased by over 100% in the ten year period to 1996, rising from £63.9 million to £130.3 million. During a review of the scheme in 1990/91 the Department of Health and Children (the Department) and the Irish Medical Organisation (IMO) agreed that the level of prescribing could be reduced without having an adverse effect on the quality of patient care. Following this review the Department and the IMO agreed to introduce an incentive scheme known as the Indicative Drug Target Scheme (IDTS), with effect from 1 January 1993, to encourage more rational and economic prescribing. The Department also agreed to establish a General Practice Development Fund which would also provide for investments in general practice. In 1994 the Department published a Strategy document, which identified organisational and service problems in the health services. The steps to be taken to develop the service were set out in an action plan covering the period 1994 to 1997. The examination focused on • the steps being taken to promote more cost effective prescribing within the GMS scheme and to determine whether there is potential for further savings • the extent to which the required improvements identified in the 1994 Strategy document have been implemented. The Indicative Drug Target Scheme The IDTS provides for the calculation of monetary prescribing targets for each General Practitioner (GP) taking into consideration the make-up of his/her patient panel. Savings from achieving the targets are apportioned between the doctors concerned and the health boards to be spent on specific improvements to practices and for the overall development of the service.
Keywords:
HEALTH SERVICES; HOSPITAL
Series/Report no.:
Pn; 4477

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorDepartment of Health (DoH)en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2013-01-18T15:56:17Z-
dc.date.available2013-01-18T15:56:17Z-
dc.date.issued1997-09-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/266035-
dc.descriptionEntitlement to State funded health care is divided into two categories. Category One provides entitlement to a means tested medical card under the General Medical Services (GMS) scheme with eligibility to a comprehensive range of health services free of charge, including general practitioner services and prescribed drugs and medicines. Category Two provides entitlement to public hospital services subject to statutory charges. At 31 December 1996, the GMS scheme provided for the health care needs of 1.25 million people, representing 34.6% of the population, at a total cost of £264.1 million. The cost of drugs and medicines prescribed under the GMS scheme has increased by over 100% in the ten year period to 1996, rising from £63.9 million to £130.3 million. During a review of the scheme in 1990/91 the Department of Health and Children (the Department) and the Irish Medical Organisation (IMO) agreed that the level of prescribing could be reduced without having an adverse effect on the quality of patient care. Following this review the Department and the IMO agreed to introduce an incentive scheme known as the Indicative Drug Target Scheme (IDTS), with effect from 1 January 1993, to encourage more rational and economic prescribing. The Department also agreed to establish a General Practice Development Fund which would also provide for investments in general practice. In 1994 the Department published a Strategy document, which identified organisational and service problems in the health services. The steps to be taken to develop the service were set out in an action plan covering the period 1994 to 1997. The examination focused on • the steps being taken to promote more cost effective prescribing within the GMS scheme and to determine whether there is potential for further savings • the extent to which the required improvements identified in the 1994 Strategy document have been implemented. The Indicative Drug Target Scheme The IDTS provides for the calculation of monetary prescribing targets for each General Practitioner (GP) taking into consideration the make-up of his/her patient panel. Savings from achieving the targets are apportioned between the doctors concerned and the health boards to be spent on specific improvements to practices and for the overall development of the service.en_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherGovernment of Irelanden_GB
dc.relation.ispartofseriesPnen_GB
dc.relation.ispartofseries4477en_GB
dc.subjectHEALTH SERVICESen_GB
dc.subjectHOSPITALen_GB
dc.titlePrescribing practises and the development of General Practitioner Services.en_GB
dc.typeReporten
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