New childhood immunisation schedule 2008: Information pack.

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/265433
Title:
New childhood immunisation schedule 2008: Information pack.
Authors:
Health Service Executive (HSE)
Publisher:
Health Service Executive (HSE)
Issue Date:
2008
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/265433
Item Type:
Report
Language:
en
Description:
Chronic infection is associated with an increased risk of developing cirrhosis, liver failure and hepatocellular carcinoma. Premature death from chronic liver disease occurs in approximately 15-25% of chronically infected people. How is Hepatitis B disease transmitted? Hepatitis B virus (HBV) has been found in virtually all body secretions and excretions. However, only blood (and serum-derived fluids), saliva, semen and vaginal fluids have been shown to be infectious. People with chronic HBV infection are the primary reservoirs of infection. Transmission mainly occurs by: • Sexual intercourse • Blood-to-blood contact • Transmission from infected mother to child • Transmission has rarely followed bites from infected individuals Transmission by transfusion of contaminated blood or blood products is now rare because of routine screening of blood donors and viral inactivation of certain blood products.
Keywords:
PUBLIC INFORMATION; INFECTION CONTROL; COMMUNICABLE DISEASES

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorHealth Service Executive (HSE)en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2013-01-15T09:03:53Z-
dc.date.available2013-01-15T09:03:53Z-
dc.date.issued2008-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/265433-
dc.descriptionChronic infection is associated with an increased risk of developing cirrhosis, liver failure and hepatocellular carcinoma. Premature death from chronic liver disease occurs in approximately 15-25% of chronically infected people. How is Hepatitis B disease transmitted? Hepatitis B virus (HBV) has been found in virtually all body secretions and excretions. However, only blood (and serum-derived fluids), saliva, semen and vaginal fluids have been shown to be infectious. People with chronic HBV infection are the primary reservoirs of infection. Transmission mainly occurs by: • Sexual intercourse • Blood-to-blood contact • Transmission from infected mother to child • Transmission has rarely followed bites from infected individuals Transmission by transfusion of contaminated blood or blood products is now rare because of routine screening of blood donors and viral inactivation of certain blood products.en_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherHealth Service Executive (HSE)en_GB
dc.subjectPUBLIC INFORMATIONen_GB
dc.subjectINFECTION CONTROLen_GB
dc.subjectCOMMUNICABLE DISEASESen_GB
dc.titleNew childhood immunisation schedule 2008: Information pack.en_GB
dc.typeReporten
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