Renal allograft loss in the first post-operative month: causes and consequences.

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/265424
Title:
Renal allograft loss in the first post-operative month: causes and consequences.
Authors:
Phelan, Paul J; O'Kelly, Patrick; Tarazi, Munir; Tarazi, Nadim; Salehmohamed, M Ridhwaan; Little, Dilly M; Magee, Colm; Conlon, Peter J
Affiliation:
Departments of Nephrology, Beaumont Hospital, Dublin, Ireland. paulphel@gmail.com
Citation:
Renal allograft loss in the first post-operative month: causes and consequences., 26 (4):544-9 Clin Transplant
Journal:
Clinical transplantation
Issue Date:
15-Jan-2013
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/265424
PubMed ID:
23050275
Abstract:
Early transplant failure is a devastating outcome after kidney transplantation. We report the causes and consequences of deceased donor renal transplant failure in the first 30 d at our center between January 1990 and December 2009. Controls were adult deceased donor transplant patients in the same period with an allograft that functioned >30 d. The incidence of early graft failure in our series of 2381 consecutive deceased donor transplants was 4.6% (n = 109). The causes of failure were allograft thrombosis (n = 48; 44%), acute rejection (n = 19; 17.4%), death with a functioning allograft (n = 17; 15.6%), primary non-function (n = 14;12.8%), and other causes (n = 11; 10.1%). Mean time to allograft failure was 7.3 d. There has been a decreased incidence of all-cause early failure from 7% in 1990 to <1% in 2009. Patients who developed early failure had longer cold ischemia times when compared with patients with allografts lasting >30 d (p < 0.001). Early allograft failure was strongly associated with reduced patient survival (p < 0.001). In conclusion, early renal allograft failure is associated with a survival disadvantage, but has thankfully become less common in recent years.
Item Type:
Article
Language:
en
MeSH:
Adult; Cadaver; Female; Follow-Up Studies; Graft Rejection; Humans; Kidney Diseases; Kidney Transplantation; Male; Middle Aged; Postoperative Complications; Prognosis; Retrospective Studies; Risk Factors; Survival Rate; Tissue Donors
ISSN:
1399-0012

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorPhelan, Paul Jen_GB
dc.contributor.authorO'Kelly, Patricken_GB
dc.contributor.authorTarazi, Muniren_GB
dc.contributor.authorTarazi, Nadimen_GB
dc.contributor.authorSalehmohamed, M Ridhwaanen_GB
dc.contributor.authorLittle, Dilly Men_GB
dc.contributor.authorMagee, Colmen_GB
dc.contributor.authorConlon, Peter Jen_GB
dc.date.accessioned2013-01-15T09:47:34Z-
dc.date.available2013-01-15T09:47:34Z-
dc.date.issued2013-01-15-
dc.identifier.citationRenal allograft loss in the first post-operative month: causes and consequences., 26 (4):544-9 Clin Transplanten_GB
dc.identifier.issn1399-0012-
dc.identifier.pmid23050275-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/265424-
dc.description.abstractEarly transplant failure is a devastating outcome after kidney transplantation. We report the causes and consequences of deceased donor renal transplant failure in the first 30 d at our center between January 1990 and December 2009. Controls were adult deceased donor transplant patients in the same period with an allograft that functioned >30 d. The incidence of early graft failure in our series of 2381 consecutive deceased donor transplants was 4.6% (n = 109). The causes of failure were allograft thrombosis (n = 48; 44%), acute rejection (n = 19; 17.4%), death with a functioning allograft (n = 17; 15.6%), primary non-function (n = 14;12.8%), and other causes (n = 11; 10.1%). Mean time to allograft failure was 7.3 d. There has been a decreased incidence of all-cause early failure from 7% in 1990 to <1% in 2009. Patients who developed early failure had longer cold ischemia times when compared with patients with allografts lasting >30 d (p < 0.001). Early allograft failure was strongly associated with reduced patient survival (p < 0.001). In conclusion, early renal allograft failure is associated with a survival disadvantage, but has thankfully become less common in recent years.en_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Clinical transplantationen_GB
dc.subject.meshAdult-
dc.subject.meshCadaver-
dc.subject.meshFemale-
dc.subject.meshFollow-Up Studies-
dc.subject.meshGraft Rejection-
dc.subject.meshHumans-
dc.subject.meshKidney Diseases-
dc.subject.meshKidney Transplantation-
dc.subject.meshMale-
dc.subject.meshMiddle Aged-
dc.subject.meshPostoperative Complications-
dc.subject.meshPrognosis-
dc.subject.meshRetrospective Studies-
dc.subject.meshRisk Factors-
dc.subject.meshSurvival Rate-
dc.subject.meshTissue Donors-
dc.titleRenal allograft loss in the first post-operative month: causes and consequences.en_GB
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentDepartments of Nephrology, Beaumont Hospital, Dublin, Ireland. paulphel@gmail.comen_GB
dc.identifier.journalClinical transplantationen_GB
dc.description.provinceLeinsteren

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