National Sudden Infant Death Register: report for the fifth year, 1st January 1996 to 31st December 1996.

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/265416
Title:
National Sudden Infant Death Register: report for the fifth year, 1st January 1996 to 31st December 1996.
Authors:
Department of Health (DoH)
Publisher:
Department of Health (DoH)
Issue Date:
1997
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/265416
Item Type:
Report
Language:
en
Description:
The infant mortality rate in the Republic of Ireland has continued to decline from a rate of 8 per 1,000 live births in 1991 to a record low of 5.5 per 1,000 live births in 1996. reland now boasts one of the lowest infant mortality rates among the developed countries and ranks third lowest among EU countries. This dramatic decline is primarily attributed to a drop in the post-neonatal (deaths in infants over 28 days and under one year of age) mortality rate. The infant mortality rate in 1996 fell by 13% from 6.3 in 1995 to 5.5 per 1,000 live births in 1996. 1.2 To continue the work of the Register, phase two National Lottery funding was made available by the Department of Health to the Irish Sudden Infant Death Association (ISIDA). In November 1992, ISIDA's Scientific Advisory Committee recommended strengthening the data collected by the Register through the implementation of a Case Control study. Application was made to the Department of Health for funding support. Agreement was. reached to implement a two-phased Case Control study. Phase One comprising of a two centred study, was conducted during 1993 in the Eastern and Western Health Board areas. Phase Two, a two year nation-wide Case Control study, commenced in January 1994 and was completed in December 1995. Application for phase three National Lottery funding was. submitted to the Department of Health and agreement given to fund the Register's Research work, including the nation-wide Case Control study, for a further two year period.
Keywords:
INFANT MORTALITY; SUDDEN INFANT DEATH SYNDROME

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorDepartment of Health (DoH)en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2013-01-15T09:01:18Z-
dc.date.available2013-01-15T09:01:18Z-
dc.date.issued1997-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/265416-
dc.descriptionThe infant mortality rate in the Republic of Ireland has continued to decline from a rate of 8 per 1,000 live births in 1991 to a record low of 5.5 per 1,000 live births in 1996. reland now boasts one of the lowest infant mortality rates among the developed countries and ranks third lowest among EU countries. This dramatic decline is primarily attributed to a drop in the post-neonatal (deaths in infants over 28 days and under one year of age) mortality rate. The infant mortality rate in 1996 fell by 13% from 6.3 in 1995 to 5.5 per 1,000 live births in 1996. 1.2 To continue the work of the Register, phase two National Lottery funding was made available by the Department of Health to the Irish Sudden Infant Death Association (ISIDA). In November 1992, ISIDA's Scientific Advisory Committee recommended strengthening the data collected by the Register through the implementation of a Case Control study. Application was made to the Department of Health for funding support. Agreement was. reached to implement a two-phased Case Control study. Phase One comprising of a two centred study, was conducted during 1993 in the Eastern and Western Health Board areas. Phase Two, a two year nation-wide Case Control study, commenced in January 1994 and was completed in December 1995. Application for phase three National Lottery funding was. submitted to the Department of Health and agreement given to fund the Register's Research work, including the nation-wide Case Control study, for a further two year period.en_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherDepartment of Health (DoH)en_GB
dc.subjectINFANT MORTALITYen_GB
dc.subjectSUDDEN INFANT DEATH SYNDROMEen_GB
dc.titleNational Sudden Infant Death Register: report for the fifth year, 1st January 1996 to 31st December 1996.en_GB
dc.typeReporten
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