National Haemovigilance Office annual report 2000.

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/265257
Title:
National Haemovigilance Office annual report 2000.
Authors:
National Haemovigilance Office
Publisher:
National Haeovigilance Office
Issue Date:
2000
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/265257
Item Type:
Report
Language:
en
Description:
The National Haemovigilance Office (NHO) is now firmly established in its role of collecting and analysing voluntary confidential information relating to adverse clinical reports from blood transfusion. The first Annual Report of the NHO covered the relatively short period from 1 October 1999 to 31 December 1999, but illustrated that transfusion of a blood component to the wrong patient was the most frequent problem, (44% of reports). This year, the first complete year of reporting, the category of incorrect blood component transfused (IBCT) again exceeds all others. The Report's findings illustrate that while blood transfusion therapy is a safe procedure, there is still a need to develop and perfect systems at hospital level to ensure safety and elimination of errors at all stages of the transfusion chain. A considerable number of recommendations have ensued from the analysis of the reports received and these are summarised at the beginning of this report and expanded upon within each appropriate chapter. Primary areas of concern are those incidents in the categories of IBCT and transfusion associated circulatory overload (TACO) as these incidents provide opportunities for improved practice. In order to achieve improvements in transfusion safety - which is the ultimate goal of the National Haemovigilance programme - the office has continued to extend its involvement with hospital based Transfusion Surveillance Officers (TSO) in a pro-active way. Extensive educational visits, together with the development of in-service education programmes have continued. This aspect of the programme has been most rewarding, with a steady building of mutual trust and networking between the NHO staff, hospital based TSOs and others working in the area of transfusion throughout the country. The NHO again wishes to acknowledge the support of Consultant Haematologists, Hospital based TSOs, Hospital Laboratory Technologists and Hospital Consultants in the many hospitals who have participated and supported this programme. The continued feedback from the wider 'transfusion community' is most encouraging. Thanks are also due to the Minister for Health and Children and his Department, Directors of Nursing, Chief Executive Officers and Hospital Administrative staff.
Keywords:
BLOOD TRANSFUSION; MONITORING

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorNational Haemovigilance Officeen_GB
dc.date.accessioned2013-01-14T14:06:24Z-
dc.date.available2013-01-14T14:06:24Z-
dc.date.issued2000-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/265257-
dc.descriptionThe National Haemovigilance Office (NHO) is now firmly established in its role of collecting and analysing voluntary confidential information relating to adverse clinical reports from blood transfusion. The first Annual Report of the NHO covered the relatively short period from 1 October 1999 to 31 December 1999, but illustrated that transfusion of a blood component to the wrong patient was the most frequent problem, (44% of reports). This year, the first complete year of reporting, the category of incorrect blood component transfused (IBCT) again exceeds all others. The Report's findings illustrate that while blood transfusion therapy is a safe procedure, there is still a need to develop and perfect systems at hospital level to ensure safety and elimination of errors at all stages of the transfusion chain. A considerable number of recommendations have ensued from the analysis of the reports received and these are summarised at the beginning of this report and expanded upon within each appropriate chapter. Primary areas of concern are those incidents in the categories of IBCT and transfusion associated circulatory overload (TACO) as these incidents provide opportunities for improved practice. In order to achieve improvements in transfusion safety - which is the ultimate goal of the National Haemovigilance programme - the office has continued to extend its involvement with hospital based Transfusion Surveillance Officers (TSO) in a pro-active way. Extensive educational visits, together with the development of in-service education programmes have continued. This aspect of the programme has been most rewarding, with a steady building of mutual trust and networking between the NHO staff, hospital based TSOs and others working in the area of transfusion throughout the country. The NHO again wishes to acknowledge the support of Consultant Haematologists, Hospital based TSOs, Hospital Laboratory Technologists and Hospital Consultants in the many hospitals who have participated and supported this programme. The continued feedback from the wider 'transfusion community' is most encouraging. Thanks are also due to the Minister for Health and Children and his Department, Directors of Nursing, Chief Executive Officers and Hospital Administrative staff.en_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherNational Haeovigilance Officeen_GB
dc.subjectBLOOD TRANSFUSIONen_GB
dc.subjectMONITORINGen_GB
dc.titleNational Haemovigilance Office annual report 2000.en_GB
dc.typeReporten
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