Movers and shakers: a study of community involvement in responding to the drugs issue based on data from participants who took part in the Community Addiction Studies Course: 1994-1999: research. .

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/265255
Title:
Movers and shakers: a study of community involvement in responding to the drugs issue based on data from participants who took part in the Community Addiction Studies Course: 1994-1999: research. .
Authors:
Ballymun Youth Action Project
Publisher:
Ballymun Youth Action Project
Issue Date:
2001
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/265255
Item Type:
Study
Language:
en
Description:
The high response rate achieved ,in this study, is an indicator of the continued interest and , Involvement of the respondents In the drugs Issue. The Involvement of local communities in Dublin has been evident since 1980. That involvement has, since 1996, been an integral part of national strategy to reduce the demand for drugs. This study gives a snapshot of some of those involved. A significant number of respondents were involved through personal/family circumstances - 70/196, or 35%. The National Drugs Initiative is enhanced by the involvement of those most affected, living through a drug problem themselves, or experiencing problems in a family member. Since drug users are often described as being one of the most marginalised groups in our society, this level of involvement would seem to be of special significance. This involvement is particularly highlighted in the group who describe themselves as paid drugs workers after they had completed the course. Almost half of this group (46% 26 people), were people who got involved.through personal or family circumstances. It is important to note that 55% of respondents did not hold the Leaving Certificate before undertaking)his course. At the other end of the spectrum, 25% had been educated to third level or post graduate level. The mix of participants seems to have been one of the most important aspects of the course. Respondents attributed the rich learning landscape to this. The number in full time employment increased by 12%. There seems to be some evidence of a certain trend among those who moved into paid employment in the drugs area to be from the less formally educated group. Although this indicates success among a group which finds it more difficult to obtain employment, a certain caution needs to be exercised. The broad range of tasks being performed, with the fact that many are unsure of their employment conditions, and the numbers working part time highlight the lack of constructive, strategic career paths for these workers. They are vulnerable if the economic climate changes, or the political will to tackle the drugs issue wanes. The drugs issue is a catalyst to bring people into education, taking the lived experience of the participants as a starting point. 59% of the respondents went on to some other kind of further training. The number of full time students had increased by 4%. Given the high proportion of early school leavers, it is significant that so many continue education after completing the Community Addiction Studies Course. It should be of concern that curriculum development is at best patchy, and at worst non existent, for such people progressing through a community education process.
Keywords:
ADDICTION; EDUCATION
ISBN:
095415240X

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorBallymun Youth Action Projecten_GB
dc.date.accessioned2013-01-14T14:06:02Z-
dc.date.available2013-01-14T14:06:02Z-
dc.date.issued2001-
dc.identifier.isbn095415240X-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/265255-
dc.descriptionThe high response rate achieved ,in this study, is an indicator of the continued interest and , Involvement of the respondents In the drugs Issue. The Involvement of local communities in Dublin has been evident since 1980. That involvement has, since 1996, been an integral part of national strategy to reduce the demand for drugs. This study gives a snapshot of some of those involved. A significant number of respondents were involved through personal/family circumstances - 70/196, or 35%. The National Drugs Initiative is enhanced by the involvement of those most affected, living through a drug problem themselves, or experiencing problems in a family member. Since drug users are often described as being one of the most marginalised groups in our society, this level of involvement would seem to be of special significance. This involvement is particularly highlighted in the group who describe themselves as paid drugs workers after they had completed the course. Almost half of this group (46% 26 people), were people who got involved.through personal or family circumstances. It is important to note that 55% of respondents did not hold the Leaving Certificate before undertaking)his course. At the other end of the spectrum, 25% had been educated to third level or post graduate level. The mix of participants seems to have been one of the most important aspects of the course. Respondents attributed the rich learning landscape to this. The number in full time employment increased by 12%. There seems to be some evidence of a certain trend among those who moved into paid employment in the drugs area to be from the less formally educated group. Although this indicates success among a group which finds it more difficult to obtain employment, a certain caution needs to be exercised. The broad range of tasks being performed, with the fact that many are unsure of their employment conditions, and the numbers working part time highlight the lack of constructive, strategic career paths for these workers. They are vulnerable if the economic climate changes, or the political will to tackle the drugs issue wanes. The drugs issue is a catalyst to bring people into education, taking the lived experience of the participants as a starting point. 59% of the respondents went on to some other kind of further training. The number of full time students had increased by 4%. Given the high proportion of early school leavers, it is significant that so many continue education after completing the Community Addiction Studies Course. It should be of concern that curriculum development is at best patchy, and at worst non existent, for such people progressing through a community education process.en_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherBallymun Youth Action Projecten_GB
dc.subjectADDICTIONen_GB
dc.subjectEDUCATIONen_GB
dc.titleMovers and shakers: a study of community involvement in responding to the drugs issue based on data from participants who took part in the Community Addiction Studies Course: 1994-1999: research. .en_GB
dc.typeStudyen
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