Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/265072
Title:
Interim report of the Expert Group on Domiciliary Births.
Authors:
Eastern Health Board (EHB)
Publisher:
Eastern Health Board (EHB)
Issue Date:
Oct-1997
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/265072
Item Type:
Report
Language:
en
Description:
In November 1996, the Chief Executive Officer group was requested by the Department of Health to consider the issue of domiciliary births. The background to this request was as follows: Although the policy of the Department is that births should take place in consultant-staffed maternity units, a small number of mothers insist on having a home birth. There is a statutory entitlement to assistance from the health board, but it is difficult in practice to meet this requirement and in most cases health boards are now providing an ex-gratia contribution towards the cost of hiring a private mid-wife; The Review Group on the Maternity and Infant Care Scheme (whose report is likely to be published shortly in conjunction with the Women's Health Plan) gives a strong endorsement to the policy on the preferred location of births, but recognises that arrangements must be made to cater for those who insist on a home birth. The Review Group recommends that each health board should put in place a hospital out-reach service to that end. However, when the Department consulted with health board on this, some felt the approach was feasible but others saw major difficulties. Consequently, it is intended that, in launching the Women's Health Plan, the Minister will say that the hospital-outreach approach is a possible solution but that an initial assessment indicates practical problems; that the designation of certain public health nurses and/or contracted private midwives, with the involvement of general practitioners and with regular refresher training, is another possible approach; and that each approach is to be piloted in a health board to establish feasibility and comparative effectiveness, or whether different approaches may be required in different geographic/demographic circumstances; The Ombudsman has recently taken an interest in this area. He stresses that the statutory duty must be implemented, but, in view of the practical problems and the proposed pilot schemes, he is prepared to accept the current ex-gratia approach (provided it is implemented consistently in all boards) as an interim solution. He wants to be kept informed of progress and will review the situation periodically.
Keywords:
CHILDBIRTH; DOMICILIARY SERVICE; HOME CARE

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorEastern Health Board (EHB)en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2013-01-13T14:51:24Z-
dc.date.available2013-01-13T14:51:24Z-
dc.date.issued1997-10-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/265072-
dc.descriptionIn November 1996, the Chief Executive Officer group was requested by the Department of Health to consider the issue of domiciliary births. The background to this request was as follows: Although the policy of the Department is that births should take place in consultant-staffed maternity units, a small number of mothers insist on having a home birth. There is a statutory entitlement to assistance from the health board, but it is difficult in practice to meet this requirement and in most cases health boards are now providing an ex-gratia contribution towards the cost of hiring a private mid-wife; The Review Group on the Maternity and Infant Care Scheme (whose report is likely to be published shortly in conjunction with the Women's Health Plan) gives a strong endorsement to the policy on the preferred location of births, but recognises that arrangements must be made to cater for those who insist on a home birth. The Review Group recommends that each health board should put in place a hospital out-reach service to that end. However, when the Department consulted with health board on this, some felt the approach was feasible but others saw major difficulties. Consequently, it is intended that, in launching the Women's Health Plan, the Minister will say that the hospital-outreach approach is a possible solution but that an initial assessment indicates practical problems; that the designation of certain public health nurses and/or contracted private midwives, with the involvement of general practitioners and with regular refresher training, is another possible approach; and that each approach is to be piloted in a health board to establish feasibility and comparative effectiveness, or whether different approaches may be required in different geographic/demographic circumstances; The Ombudsman has recently taken an interest in this area. He stresses that the statutory duty must be implemented, but, in view of the practical problems and the proposed pilot schemes, he is prepared to accept the current ex-gratia approach (provided it is implemented consistently in all boards) as an interim solution. He wants to be kept informed of progress and will review the situation periodically.en_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherEastern Health Board (EHB)en_GB
dc.subjectCHILDBIRTHen_GB
dc.subjectDOMICILIARY SERVICEen_GB
dc.subjectHOME CAREen_GB
dc.titleInterim report of the Expert Group on Domiciliary Births.en_GB
dc.typeReporten
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