Caring about Women and Cancer (CAWAC): results of the survey in the Republic of Ireland and Northern Ireland.

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/264382
Title:
Caring about Women and Cancer (CAWAC): results of the survey in the Republic of Ireland and Northern Ireland.
Authors:
Codd, Mary B. on behalf of the CAWAC National Advisory Board of Ireland.
Publisher:
CAWAC National Advisory Board of Ireland.
Issue Date:
2000
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/264382
Item Type:
Report
Language:
en
Description:
This report presents the results of a unique survey of Irish women with breast and gynaecological cancer. The survey in Ireland was part of a collaborative pan-European initiative known as the "Caring about Women and Cancer" (CAWAC) project, which was set up to investigate and report on aspects of the diagnosis and treatment of breast and gynaecological cancers in 15 European countries. Over 700 Irish women participated in the self-administered questionnaire survey. Information was sought on their knowledge and perceptions of cancer prior to diagnosis, their use of relevant screening tests prior to diagnosis, their satisfaction with aspects of the diagnosis and treatment of cancer and the impact of cancer on their relationships and lifestyle. The key findings of the survey are: Women are relatively uninformed about cancer prior to diagnosis. When asked about sources of information on cancer, television, radio and magazines are identified as the principal sources. Use of screening tests for breast and gynaecological cancers in the population is low, though a high proportion of the women surveyed believe that early detection results in improved survival from cancer. Almost a quarter of the women surveyed waited one month or more before seeking medical advice for symptoms or signs of breast or gynaecological cancer. Just over one-third of the women surveyed (37%) received their diagnosis within a week of seeking medical attention; two-thirds were informed within three weeks of presentation. The remainder waited one month or more before being informed of their diagnosis (28%) or did not respond to the question(6%). This differed by cancer type; a higher proportion of women with gynaecological cancer waited a month or more for results compared to women with breast cancer. Levels of satisfaction with the interval to receipt of diagnosis reflect the delays as outlined. Of women with breast cancer, 70% were satisfied with the interval. Of women with gynaecological cancer, only 50% were satisfied. The majority of women were extremely satisfied or quite satisfied with the way in which the diagnosis was communicated, the time spent in the explanation, the 'openness' of doctors and nurses, the opportunity to ask questions and the information provided. For 88% of women, the diagnosis was communicated by a doctor in a face-to-face situation. Two-thirds of women were treated within three weeks of their diagnosis; for 27% there was a delay of one month or more between diagnosis and onset of treatment. The majority of women were extremely satisfied or quite satisfied with the information they received about their treatment and with the care they received in hospital. They were less satisfied with waiting times for treatment, in particular for radiotherapy. With regard to side-effects, though satisfied with information given prior to treatment, 25% of patients who received chemotherapy found the side-effects to be worse than they expected.
Keywords:
CANCER; WOMEN'S HEALTH

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorCodd, Mary B. on behalf of the CAWAC National Advisory Board of Ireland.en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2013-01-07T16:11:03Z-
dc.date.available2013-01-07T16:11:03Z-
dc.date.issued2000-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/264382-
dc.descriptionThis report presents the results of a unique survey of Irish women with breast and gynaecological cancer. The survey in Ireland was part of a collaborative pan-European initiative known as the "Caring about Women and Cancer" (CAWAC) project, which was set up to investigate and report on aspects of the diagnosis and treatment of breast and gynaecological cancers in 15 European countries. Over 700 Irish women participated in the self-administered questionnaire survey. Information was sought on their knowledge and perceptions of cancer prior to diagnosis, their use of relevant screening tests prior to diagnosis, their satisfaction with aspects of the diagnosis and treatment of cancer and the impact of cancer on their relationships and lifestyle. The key findings of the survey are: Women are relatively uninformed about cancer prior to diagnosis. When asked about sources of information on cancer, television, radio and magazines are identified as the principal sources. Use of screening tests for breast and gynaecological cancers in the population is low, though a high proportion of the women surveyed believe that early detection results in improved survival from cancer. Almost a quarter of the women surveyed waited one month or more before seeking medical advice for symptoms or signs of breast or gynaecological cancer. Just over one-third of the women surveyed (37%) received their diagnosis within a week of seeking medical attention; two-thirds were informed within three weeks of presentation. The remainder waited one month or more before being informed of their diagnosis (28%) or did not respond to the question(6%). This differed by cancer type; a higher proportion of women with gynaecological cancer waited a month or more for results compared to women with breast cancer. Levels of satisfaction with the interval to receipt of diagnosis reflect the delays as outlined. Of women with breast cancer, 70% were satisfied with the interval. Of women with gynaecological cancer, only 50% were satisfied. The majority of women were extremely satisfied or quite satisfied with the way in which the diagnosis was communicated, the time spent in the explanation, the 'openness' of doctors and nurses, the opportunity to ask questions and the information provided. For 88% of women, the diagnosis was communicated by a doctor in a face-to-face situation. Two-thirds of women were treated within three weeks of their diagnosis; for 27% there was a delay of one month or more between diagnosis and onset of treatment. The majority of women were extremely satisfied or quite satisfied with the information they received about their treatment and with the care they received in hospital. They were less satisfied with waiting times for treatment, in particular for radiotherapy. With regard to side-effects, though satisfied with information given prior to treatment, 25% of patients who received chemotherapy found the side-effects to be worse than they expected.en_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherCAWAC National Advisory Board of Ireland.en_GB
dc.subjectCANCERen_GB
dc.subjectWOMEN'S HEALTHen_GB
dc.titleCaring about Women and Cancer (CAWAC): results of the survey in the Republic of Ireland and Northern Ireland.en_GB
dc.typeReporten
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