Care for the dying: experiences and challenges: a study of quality of health service care during the last year of life of patients at St James's Hospital, Dublin from their relatives' perspective.

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/264381
Title:
Care for the dying: experiences and challenges: a study of quality of health service care during the last year of life of patients at St James's Hospital, Dublin from their relatives' perspective.
Authors:
Keegan, Orla; McGee, Hannah; Brady, Therese; St James's Hospital. Palliative Care Service.; Irish Hospice Foundation.; Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland. Department of Psychology. Health Services Resource Centre.
Affiliation:
Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland. Department of Psychology. Health Services Resource Centre.
Publisher:
Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland. Department of Psychology. Health Services Resource Centre.
Issue Date:
Feb-1999
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/264381
Item Type:
Study
Language:
en
Description:
While 66% of all Irish deaths take place in hospitals or institutions, 80% of patients with terminal illness spend most of the last year of life at home. The World Health Organisation (1990) defines palliative care as: the active total care of patients and their families by a multi-professional team when the patient's disease is no longer responsive to curative treatment. A high proportion of health care for people near to death will be provided by health professionals other than palliative care specialists. The principles of palliative care should therefore pervade clinical practice across all health care settings The hospital based palliative care service at Saint James's Hospital was set up in April 1996 as a hospital-based palliative care service with expertise in advising on pain and symptom control, offering support to patients and relatives and educating general hospital staff in the principles of palliative care The present study describes the health service experience of patients who died in the care of Saint James's Hospital; a large 720 bedded urban teaching hospital with over 800 in-hospital deaths per year It compares the experiences of those who did or did not receive palliative care as part of their treatment. The study aims to describe the experience of death and bereavement in a contemporary urban hospital setting, to consider the role of a specialist palliative care service within that system and to make evidence-based recommendations to optimise quality of care for dying patients and their families.
Keywords:
PALLIATIVE CARE; HOSPITAL

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorKeegan, Orlaen_GB
dc.contributor.authorMcGee, Hannahen_GB
dc.contributor.authorBrady, Thereseen_GB
dc.contributor.authorSt James's Hospital. Palliative Care Service.en_GB
dc.contributor.authorIrish Hospice Foundation.en_GB
dc.contributor.authorRoyal College of Surgeons in Ireland. Department of Psychology. Health Services Resource Centre.en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2013-01-07T16:10:44Z-
dc.date.available2013-01-07T16:10:44Z-
dc.date.issued1999-02-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/264381-
dc.descriptionWhile 66% of all Irish deaths take place in hospitals or institutions, 80% of patients with terminal illness spend most of the last year of life at home. The World Health Organisation (1990) defines palliative care as: the active total care of patients and their families by a multi-professional team when the patient's disease is no longer responsive to curative treatment. A high proportion of health care for people near to death will be provided by health professionals other than palliative care specialists. The principles of palliative care should therefore pervade clinical practice across all health care settings The hospital based palliative care service at Saint James's Hospital was set up in April 1996 as a hospital-based palliative care service with expertise in advising on pain and symptom control, offering support to patients and relatives and educating general hospital staff in the principles of palliative care The present study describes the health service experience of patients who died in the care of Saint James's Hospital; a large 720 bedded urban teaching hospital with over 800 in-hospital deaths per year It compares the experiences of those who did or did not receive palliative care as part of their treatment. The study aims to describe the experience of death and bereavement in a contemporary urban hospital setting, to consider the role of a specialist palliative care service within that system and to make evidence-based recommendations to optimise quality of care for dying patients and their families.en_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherRoyal College of Surgeons in Ireland. Department of Psychology. Health Services Resource Centre.en_GB
dc.subjectPALLIATIVE CAREen_GB
dc.subjectHOSPITALen_GB
dc.titleCare for the dying: experiences and challenges: a study of quality of health service care during the last year of life of patients at St James's Hospital, Dublin from their relatives' perspective.en_GB
dc.typeStudyen
dc.contributor.departmentRoyal College of Surgeons in Ireland. Department of Psychology. Health Services Resource Centre.en_GB
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