National Disease Surveillance Centre biological threat agents.

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/264379
Title:
National Disease Surveillance Centre biological threat agents.
Authors:
Department of Health (DoH); National Disease Surveillance Centre (NDSC)
Publisher:
Department of Health (DoH)
Issue Date:
2002
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/264379
Item Type:
Report
Language:
en
Description:
This document is intended to give an overview of the clinical management and public health implications of selected biological threat agents thought most likely to be used in terrorist attacks. The likelihood of such attacks were considered to be remote until the airliner attacks in the US on September 11th, 2001 and the mailing of finely milled anthrax spores to agencies and individuals in the US during October 2001. Systems for dealing with such incidents have been put in place by governments across the world in order to address the unlikely widespread use of such tactics by terrorist organisations. Early detection is essential for ensuring a prompt response to biological attacks. Features that should alert healthcare providers to the possibility of a bioterrorism related outbreak include: • A rapidly increasing disease incidence in a normally healthy population • An unusual increase in the number of people seeking care, particularly with fever, respiratory or gastrointestinal complaints • An endemic disease rapidly emerging at an uncharacteristic time or in an unusual pattern (e.g. an increase in what appears to be chickenpox-like illness among adult patients, but which might be smallpox) • Clusters of patients arriving from a single locale • Large numbers of potentially fatal cases (e.g. a large number of cases of acute flaccid paralysis with prominent bulbar palsies, suggestive of a release of botulinum, toxin) • Anyone patient presenting with a disease that is relatively uncommon and has bioterrorism potential The agents thought most likely to be used in such attacks include: I. Anthrax, 2. Smallpox, 3. Botulinum toxin, 4. Plague, and 5. Tularaemia
Keywords:
BIOTERRORISM; PUBLIC HEALTH

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorDepartment of Health (DoH)en_GB
dc.contributor.authorNational Disease Surveillance Centre (NDSC)en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2013-01-07T16:10:05Z-
dc.date.available2013-01-07T16:10:05Z-
dc.date.issued2002-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/264379-
dc.descriptionThis document is intended to give an overview of the clinical management and public health implications of selected biological threat agents thought most likely to be used in terrorist attacks. The likelihood of such attacks were considered to be remote until the airliner attacks in the US on September 11th, 2001 and the mailing of finely milled anthrax spores to agencies and individuals in the US during October 2001. Systems for dealing with such incidents have been put in place by governments across the world in order to address the unlikely widespread use of such tactics by terrorist organisations. Early detection is essential for ensuring a prompt response to biological attacks. Features that should alert healthcare providers to the possibility of a bioterrorism related outbreak include: • A rapidly increasing disease incidence in a normally healthy population • An unusual increase in the number of people seeking care, particularly with fever, respiratory or gastrointestinal complaints • An endemic disease rapidly emerging at an uncharacteristic time or in an unusual pattern (e.g. an increase in what appears to be chickenpox-like illness among adult patients, but which might be smallpox) • Clusters of patients arriving from a single locale • Large numbers of potentially fatal cases (e.g. a large number of cases of acute flaccid paralysis with prominent bulbar palsies, suggestive of a release of botulinum, toxin) • Anyone patient presenting with a disease that is relatively uncommon and has bioterrorism potential The agents thought most likely to be used in such attacks include: I. Anthrax, 2. Smallpox, 3. Botulinum toxin, 4. Plague, and 5. Tularaemiaen_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherDepartment of Health (DoH)en_GB
dc.subjectBIOTERRORISMen_GB
dc.subjectPUBLIC HEALTHen_GB
dc.titleNational Disease Surveillance Centre biological threat agents.en_GB
dc.typeReporten
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