Community/Hospital Integration Project (CHIP): an interim report to the Department of Health.

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/264360
Title:
Community/Hospital Integration Project (CHIP): an interim report to the Department of Health.
Authors:
Department of Health (DoH); St Vincent's Hospital. Department of Preventative Medicine/Cardiology; University College Dublin (UCD); Eastern Health Board (EHB)
Publisher:
Department of Health (DoH)
Issue Date:
2-Apr-1992
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/264360
Item Type:
Report
Language:
en
Description:
The Community/Hospital Integration Project (CHIP) commenced in March 1991 and will be comp1eted in April 1992. The aim of the study was to record the characteristics of patients referred for hospital admission by general practitioners (GPs),the mode of admission factors which might reduce the need for admission to acute general hospitals and communication between hospital and GP. Details of inpatient stay was recorded as well as the history of patients in the early weeks following discharge. Twenty one GP's in 10 practices were invited and agreed to participate in the study. These doctors were located in the catchment area of St. Vincent's Hospital, Elm Park, Dublin. The location of their practices is shown on the accompanying map. The doctors were asked to record the information (appendix 1) on all patients they considered to require hospital admission. One item of information required was the duration of time from seeing a mission to gaining admission. period of up to six months before a dismission was allowed. The original design of the study included an intake of patients up to January 1st 1992 and a follow-up of admissions to June 1992. In this way an estimated intake of 1000 patients would be included in the study. For the purposes of this report, intake of patients ceased in August 1991 with follow-up of admissions to February 1992.
Keywords:
HOSPITAL ADMISSION; GENERAL PRACTITIONER

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorDepartment of Health (DoH)en_GB
dc.contributor.authorSt Vincent's Hospital. Department of Preventative Medicine/Cardiologyen_GB
dc.contributor.authorUniversity College Dublin (UCD)en_GB
dc.contributor.authorEastern Health Board (EHB)en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2013-01-07T16:12:04Z-
dc.date.available2013-01-07T16:12:04Z-
dc.date.issued1992-04-02-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/264360-
dc.descriptionThe Community/Hospital Integration Project (CHIP) commenced in March 1991 and will be comp1eted in April 1992. The aim of the study was to record the characteristics of patients referred for hospital admission by general practitioners (GPs),the mode of admission factors which might reduce the need for admission to acute general hospitals and communication between hospital and GP. Details of inpatient stay was recorded as well as the history of patients in the early weeks following discharge. Twenty one GP's in 10 practices were invited and agreed to participate in the study. These doctors were located in the catchment area of St. Vincent's Hospital, Elm Park, Dublin. The location of their practices is shown on the accompanying map. The doctors were asked to record the information (appendix 1) on all patients they considered to require hospital admission. One item of information required was the duration of time from seeing a mission to gaining admission. period of up to six months before a dismission was allowed. The original design of the study included an intake of patients up to January 1st 1992 and a follow-up of admissions to June 1992. In this way an estimated intake of 1000 patients would be included in the study. For the purposes of this report, intake of patients ceased in August 1991 with follow-up of admissions to February 1992.en_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherDepartment of Health (DoH)en_GB
dc.subjectHOSPITAL ADMISSIONen_GB
dc.subjectGENERAL PRACTITIONERen_GB
dc.titleCommunity/Hospital Integration Project (CHIP): an interim report to the Department of Health.en_GB
dc.typeReporten
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