Asylum in Ireland: a public health perspective.

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/264094
Title:
Asylum in Ireland: a public health perspective.
Authors:
Begley, Michael G.; Congregation of the Holy Ghost, Dublin.; University College Dublin. Department of Public Health Medicine.
Publisher:
University College Dublin. Department of Public Health Medicine and Epidemiology.
Issue Date:
1999
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/264094
Item Type:
Report
Language:
en
Description:
Apart from intermittent groups of program refugees, officially invited as part of a government response to United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) requests, Ireland was not, until 1994, a chosen country of destination for asylum-seekers. Throughout the 1980's and up to the early part of the 1990's, this country, in contrast to its EU counterparts, received less than 100 applications annually for political asylum. Consequently, asylum issues were seldom the subject of public debate and did not arouse any great deal of socio-political concern. Service delivery was limited to addressing the relatively more manageable needs of culturally homogeneous communities of Bosnian and Vietnamese program refugees. In 1994, a significant change was signalled. The majority of new applicants came on an individual basis from a larger variety of refugee producing countries. For instance, during 1998, most (72%) came from the continent of Africa and from Eastern Europe.
Keywords:
REFUGEE; ASYLUM SEEKER; PUBLIC HEALTH

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorBegley, Michael G.en_GB
dc.contributor.authorCongregation of the Holy Ghost, Dublin.en_GB
dc.contributor.authorUniversity College Dublin. Department of Public Health Medicine.en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2013-01-03T16:47:15Z-
dc.date.available2013-01-03T16:47:15Z-
dc.date.issued1999-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/264094-
dc.descriptionApart from intermittent groups of program refugees, officially invited as part of a government response to United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) requests, Ireland was not, until 1994, a chosen country of destination for asylum-seekers. Throughout the 1980's and up to the early part of the 1990's, this country, in contrast to its EU counterparts, received less than 100 applications annually for political asylum. Consequently, asylum issues were seldom the subject of public debate and did not arouse any great deal of socio-political concern. Service delivery was limited to addressing the relatively more manageable needs of culturally homogeneous communities of Bosnian and Vietnamese program refugees. In 1994, a significant change was signalled. The majority of new applicants came on an individual basis from a larger variety of refugee producing countries. For instance, during 1998, most (72%) came from the continent of Africa and from Eastern Europe.en_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherUniversity College Dublin. Department of Public Health Medicine and Epidemiology.en_GB
dc.subjectREFUGEEen_GB
dc.subjectASYLUM SEEKERen_GB
dc.subjectPUBLIC HEALTHen_GB
dc.titleAsylum in Ireland: a public health perspective.en_GB
dc.typeReporten
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